Category: News

Centennial’s Mock Trial Team To State Semifinals

Words: Natalie Keane

From Thursday, April 19, to Friday, April 20, Centennial High’s very own Mock Trial team will be attending the Mock Trial State Semifinals in Annapolis, Maryland. They are this year’s county champions, and have previously won both rounds of Circuit Championships against Rockbridge Academy and Marriotts Ridge High School. As circuit champions two years in a row, they now continue their undefeated season this week against teams from across the state.

Centennial’s team is the first Howard County team to advance to the state semifinals in history, which is significant for its members. “Because we’re the first Howard County team to ever advance to [this level], we’re all being exposed to a different environment,” says junior Anjali Gajendiran, who acts as one of the team’s defense attorneys. “It’s definitely daunting; I’m so grateful we have this opportunity.”

“One of the best parts about Centennial moving onto state semifinals is the opportunity to compete against high-level teams, which will be a great experience for us,” says senior Kayleigh Hasson, who is the captain and a defense attorney of the team. “I’m proud to say [that] we’ve had an undefeated season so far, and the experience of winning the state title would be incredible.”

Advancing even further would be an ideal result of the semifinals, but there’s more to the competition than just winning a prize or title. Reaching this far in the competition involves building strengths and learning to work closely together as a team. “I am so proud that our team is one of the top four teams in Maryland,” says Hasson. “We’ve made Howard County history by making it this far!”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Juniors Suit Up for Practice Interviews

Words: Maddie Wirebach

Photos: Harshitha Sayini

For weeks, juniors have been preparing for a rite of passage: junior interviews. Every year the junior class drafts resumes and dresses up for the mock interviews, a requirement to graduate, in order to prepare for real life interview situations. Originally, the interviews were supposed to be during the last week of March, however due to snow days, they took place this week on April 9 and 10.

The interviewers, typically various community members, sit down with each student and ask them interview-style questions. These questions range from goals and aspirations to favorite books or movies.

During the interview, the interviewer records notes on a feedback paper which is later handed back to the student. The paper covers criteria such as eye contact, sociability, and the quality of the resume.

Many students go into the interviews nervous, so the sense of relief once finished is like no other. To all future juniors: a firm handshake and a smile goes a long way!

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

New Schools Being Built in Howard County

Words: Delanie Tucker

Photo: Howard County School Board

The Howard County School Board is making major preparations for the upcoming expansion, building a 13th high school.

On March 8, 2018, the Howard County Board of Education voted to continue with its Mission Road Site for the school, according to Howard County Public School Systems website. The intended opening is to occur in 2023.

The location for the site is 8601 Route 1 Chase Land Subdivision, a spot that will hopefully hold both the previously mentioned high school and an elementary school at some point in the future. The land covers 77 acres, definitely big enough to hold two schools.

The construction of the building is anticipated to begin in December of 2019 and to be completed in September of 2023. The project is estimated to total $124 million once it is finished.

Prior to the board deciding on the Mission Road site, there was discussion between building the school there or at Troy Park. Originally, there was concern that there would be problems due to Mission Road being near an active quarry, but the board seems to have put that problem aside.

There are no details yet about which Howard County middle schools will be distributed to this high school.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Welcomes First Ever Student-Run One Centennial

Words: Maddie Wirebach

 

Last Thursday, Centennial students had the opportunity to participate in the first-ever One Centennial event. The theme, Unity in Diversity, was aimed at helping students better understand the differences among them to ultimately unite Centennial as a school. With 28 workshops, the topics ranging from human trafficking to school safety, students were able to choose the workshop that interested them most.

The other element to One Centennial was the speaker portion in the auditorium, featuring TED Talks from students, as well as guest speaker Dr. Gina Massella.

Sophomore Hibah Khan delivered an uplifting talk about the importance of kindness, Junior Nicole Attram discussed unity in the face of adversity, and senior Samyukta Rao delivered  a humorous and humbling monologue about empathy.

In the future, Centennial hopes to absorb the lessons and messages shared and establish One Centennial as tradition.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Brightens Up Hallways with Inspire Murals [VIDEO]

Words: Maggie Ju/ Photos: Zach Grable/ Video: Julia Stitely

In the few days preceding spring break, clusters of New Forms art students could be seen painting colorful murals on the walls. Bearing inspiring messages, their work brightens the high-stress environment Centennial students are accustomed to.

The project had been scheduled to begin on March 22, but due to school cancellations, it was postponed until March 27.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Academic All-State Basketball Team Inductees

Words: Delanie Tucker

Photos: Sydney Beck

Many of Centennial’s athletes have recently earned Academic All-State Team recognition in basketball, with all of them coming from Centennial’s varsity teams. From the girls’ varsity team, seniors Mary Grace Lambert and Gracie Rockefeller were recognized. The others recognized, from the boys’ varsity team, were juniors Cameron Berkeley, Ryan Hollwedel, Matt Merkey, and Michael Kefyalew, along with seniors Kaleb Addisu and Sean Taylor.

All eight students have worked very hard to reach this point, taking three to four of their high school years to accomplish this goal.

Despite the eight of them achieving the same goal, each player boasted of different aspects that contributed to improving their athletic performance and educational integrity.

Lambert, one of the captains for girls’ varsity basketball, exclaims how grateful she is for others who have helped her along the way.

“I would just like to say thank you to my teachers, parents and coaches for supporting me and helping me, and the school for always supporting student athletes,” Lambert disclosed.

Rockefeller, the other captain for girls’ varsity, was more focused on her recent improvement and her ability to prove herself worthy of her position as captain, even though she was not given much playing time last year.

“I feel proud that I was able to make a bigger impact on the court this year.”

The girls were not the only ones who were proud of their achievements. Robert Slopek, their varsity coach, spoke highly of his captains.

“They were committed to making our program the best both on and off the court. They are both great examples of student-athletes. They complete their work and do a great job balancing their time,” Slopek praised.

Beyond the incredible accomplishments from girls’ basketball, several varsity basketball players from the boys team feel just as proficient in reaching the All-State level and express the commitment and hard work required to become successful student athletes.

Sean Taylor, a common name in the starting five for Centennial varsity, openly shared the challenges he faced to obtain the elite achievement.

“Playing basketball is what I love to do but doing well in school and getting good grades is something I pride myself on,” Taylor revealed. “To reach this level took hard work and some afternoons or nights that were homework filled and time-consuming.”

While Taylor described his struggles as a student athlete, his fellow player, Cameron Berkeley, divulged his belief that the accomplishments of the selected players were due to the effort and endurance of the entire team, whether it be on the court or in the classroom.

“It is incredible to be recognized for any accomplishments and as a team it was important that we took care of the academic side of being a student athlete in order to focus on our performance on the court,” Berkeley commented.

Centennial High School students and staff are very proud of the achievements of the school’s student athletes, and hope to see many more students emerge as leaders in their own sports.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Maryland Welcomes the Lanternfly

Words: Eliza Andrew

This spring, Marylanders have a new bug they expect to take over their state. Every year, as temperatures rise and winter comes to a close, the outbreak of the brown, odorous stink bug, which has occurred since 2006, hits Maryland at enormous levels. The harmless bug is nothing compared to the tree-eating gypsy moth that hit the state in the 1980s, yet the new alien to hit Maryland is expected to be even worse than the previous two. The spotted lanternfly, a four-winged bright bug, originated from parts of Asia including China, Vietnam, and several areas of India. It’s expected to travel down from southeast Pennsylvania this spring.

The bug was first introduced to America when a shipment of stone was brought to Berks County, PA, where the lanternfly eggs attached to the crates. Although these bugs aren’t directly harmful to people, they have infested the area and have left dozens of hardwood decks, furniture, and many fruit gardens covered in the lanternfly’s goo. The goo, otherwise known as honeydoo, can be left by the bug either while on the ground or flying above the item, dropping the honeydoo from above. Since this fly is not native to the area, and has a quick reproduction time, there are no known predators or remedies to regulate the population.

This brainy bug has tendency to latch onto different modes of transportation, including cars, trucks, and trains, making the lanternfly’s location spread even wider to unknown parts of the country. Although the bug has four, strong wings, the lanternfly is known to travel by hopping more than flying. Starting from a young age, the baby lanternfly or nymph has to learn to move around until it finally grows its wings later on in its development. Which means lots of bugs on the ground as well as in the air. They make their way inside of homes and buildings, similar to the stink bug.

There is no exact date on which we are to expect the spotted lanternfly, but since its first appearance in 2014 in Pennsylvania, the bug has turned up in parts of Delaware. Therefore, the bug is expected to make its timely appearance in Maryland this spring into summer. Residents of Maryland are cautioned to be on the lookout for the lanternfly’s egg sacks, which could be mistaken for unusual colored fungus on tree bark. If any sacks are found, the resident who spotted them is highly urged to alert Maryland wildlife control immediately to limit and prevent the infestation of the environmentally-harmful spotted lanternfly.