Tag: The Wingspan

Redistricting Options Proposed at HCPSS Family Night

Words: Delanie Tucker

On Monday, November 26, the Howard County Public School System held a Family Night for the parents/guardians of Centennial High School students to discuss options to reduce overcrowding.

HCPSS Staff shared information on the five options Centennial students will have in upcoming school years, all of which can help to reduce the number of students during portions of the school day.

The five options are: additional ARL courses, work-based options, a shuttle to Howard Community College, Project Lead the Way at Marriotts Ridge High School, and school reassignment to Glenelg or Marriotts Ridge High School with provided transportation.

All options are completely optional and based on student interest.

Due to the impact these decisions will have on community members, there was a decent-sized turn out.

According to Cynthia Dillon, Centennial’s principal, around 200 parents and students showed up, which, despite the fact that the night was aimed towards Centennial parents, also consisted of parents from both Howard High School and Marriotts Ridge High School.

Additionally, several people from Centennial’s student services team and Howard County’s Central Office attended.

This group of people included: Bill Barnes, Chief Academic Officer, Laree Siddiqui, Dual Enrollment Coordinator, Restia Whitaker, Coordinator of Student Support Services, and Pat Saunderson, Community Superintendent.

According to Dillon, the parents attending from Marriotts seemed to be curious if they would be affected by students moved to their school. Howard and Centennial parents seemed to interested in the five options.

“The parents I talked to after [the Family Night] was over seemed to be very interested in some of the options,” Dillon explained. “And I think that’s important.”

Overall, the reaction of the majority was positive and accepting of the information presented.

Another Family Night will be held on December 4 at Marriotts Ridge High School.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Life in Guatemala: An Interview with Olga Cobo Raymundo

Interview: Minah Mubasher

What was your life like in Guatemala?

My life was bad. Guatemala was dangerous. The gangs there killed my friend, Lucia. She lived next to me and was my best friend. She would always buy me gifts and was very nice. We would do our homework at my house.

Would you like to go back to Guatemala?

I cannot go back to Guatemala. I want to stay here with my father, mother, and my little sister. I also have many new friends here. Even if I wanted to go back, my mother does not have money for a plane.

How have you been adjusting to life here in Maryland?

When I came here, I was 12 years old. The people here were very nice to me. Living here is easy because there is less fear and it is safer here.

What do you miss most about Guatemala?

I miss my house in Guatemala. I also miss my sister, brother-in-law, niece, and my grandparents. My grandpa is very sick. He cannot walk and only has a couple more years to live. My mother sends him money to help pay for his medicine.

What do your friends in Guatemala think America is like?

My friends Elena thinks life here is fun. My other friend, Albaro wanted to come to America with me. His father is here and it is safer. All my friends think America is rich and that there are famous people everywhere.

Do you like life in America or Guatemala Better?

I like it here better. Everything here is better. The school is better and so are my friends. Even the food here is more tasty. There are many more options in America. I didn’t like the meat in Guatemala. The meat vendors did not wash it very well.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan

Urban Plates Restaurant Opens at Columbia Mall

Words: Javiera Diaz-Ortiz

The Columbia Mall has gained a new, modern restaurant. Urban Plates had its grand opening this summer, in late August. It is located next to one of the mall’s other modern eateries, Shake Shack.

Urban Plates offers organic, reliable options to please any craving. To add even more appeal, every single plate, sandwich, side, dessert, and even drink, is made from scratch in the Urban Plates kitchen.

Guests can see for themselves how much effort each cook puts into creating all of the products; the kitchen is visible to all guests, separated from the dining area by only a glass panel on top of the food bar.

When guests enter the restaurant, they are immediately taken aback by the interior decor. The restaurant has eye-catching colors and unique pieces, such as indoor gardens on its walls.

Guests can then choose to go into one of two lines. One line is exclusively for plates, while the other is for those craving a sandwich. Plates include selections such as free-range grilled chicken, or oven-baked, wild salmon, accompanied by sides like roasted brussels sprouts, beet and carrot salad, potatoes, among a variety of other options.

There is a separate kids’ menu with simpler, more classic meals such as mac n’ cheese. But, that does not imply the quality of food  plates such as the classic macaroni and cheese. This does not, however, suggest a lower quality of food. Even the simplest meal on the menu, the Macaroni and Cheese, looks and tastes like a gourmet dish.

All of the sodas are made at the restaurant, resulting in authentic drinks such as the pineapple cream soda.

After the main meal, guests also have the option of ordering dessert. Once again, the desserts are made from scratch at the restaurant. Selections include items such as the mango tart and the banana-cream pie, as well as a giant chocolate chip cookie.

Guests customize their order by going through the line at the food bar and requesting the main dish, sides, drink, and dessert from employees. To make the process run more smoothly, guests pay for their orders at the end of the bar, meaning there is no need for waiters.

While enjoying their meals, guests are often greeted by kind bussers who take it upon themselves to make sure that everyone’s experience at the restaurant is memorable.

Along with having a wide variety of options for food, guests are also provided with several options for seating. The restaurant has booths, tall tables, short tables, and an attractive, outdoor seating area for days with nicer weather.

Urban Plates will undoubtedly become one of the more popular sites at the mall as it offers alternative, healthy options in a welcoming, attractive environment.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Boys’ Coach Al Dodds celebrates 40 years of coaching at the Cross Country Banquet

Words: Sarah Paz

On November 12, the Centennial Boys’ and Girls’ Cross Country teams celebrated a successful season at their banquet. The season, which ended on November 10, resulted in a win for the Boys’ team and a third place finish for the Girls’ in the state meet.

The banquet started at 6:30pm and ended around 8:30pm. Runners and their families gathered to have a potluck dinner and recall the highlight of the seasons.

After the meal was finished, runners were called up by age and were awarded their certificates of participation. Coach Kevin McCoy reflected on the development of the seniors, saying that “every day was a joy, even though I didn’t act like it.”

But the wins weren’t the only thing that was celebrated. The announcement of the retirement of the beloved Boys’ Cross Country team coach Al Dodds led to much sadness from the members of the Boys’ team, especially for the seniors who had been coached by him the longest.

In his speech, Coach Dodds reflected on his more than 40 years he spent coaching, sharing the humorous moments of his career and the successes of his past teams.

After his speech, the Centennial Boys’ Cross Country team had speeches prepared for him, discussing the numerous times Coach Dodds had believed in them and impacted the way they are today. At the end, they presented him with a heartfelt gift.

Although he wants to spend more time with his grandchildren, Coach Dodds expressed the desire to continue coaching a few days a week for the Cross Country team.

Overall, the banquet was an event filled with joy and a bittersweet conclusion to a successful season.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Student Athletes Sign Off

Words: Delanie Tucker

Photos: Zach Grable

On Wednesday, November 13, seven of Centennial’s student athletes made their college intentions public.

Each of the seven had already committed to their college of choice, where they will go to continue their academic and athletic careers.

Although they all signed at the same time, none of the seven will attend the same college, and their sports of choice differ.

The students that signed are: Jackie Sterenberg to Frostburg State, Alison Betler to Towson University, Abby Doff to McDaniel College, Marissa Lagera to Monmouth, Courtney McVicker to Marshall University, Ashley Molz to American University, and Jason Kraisser to Campbell University.

Both McVicker and Molz will be attending college to play Division 1 soccer, as they played together on Varsity for Centennial.

“Committing was really rewarding for me because I grew up wanting to play collegiate soccer,” McVicker expressed. “It made me feel like all of the effort and training I had put in finally paid off.”

She continued this by stating how she decided on a college.

“Choosing Marshall was a simple decision. As cliche as it sounds, the first time I stepped on campus I had a ‘this is it’ moment; I knew it was where I wanted to go to school.”

Betler is one of the few that chose to stay local. She will attend Towson University, a school in Maryland, for cross country.

Lagera, attending Monmouth, will continue her athletic career, playing D1 lacrosse.

Lagera is very proud of her accomplishments, and thanks everyone that helped her achieve them.

“Having my friends, family, and coaches [with me] made it even more special, because they too have worked so hard for me to be able to have this and I loved being able to share my success with them.”

Another committed student was Doff, who will play collegiate field hockey.

Sterenberg, a volleyball player, is another that felt it was important to find a college that is relatively close to home.

“I was looking all up and down the east coast and something about Frostburg made me feel comfortable and at home,” Sterenberg commented. “I am most excited to contribute to the team as they compete division 2 for the first time and be part of a welcoming atmosphere.”

Lastly, Kraisser, the only male athlete, will be attending college for wrestling.

“Something I learned as an Eagle is to always persevere,” Doff expressed. “I will definitely be taking that with me through college.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Clue: A Review

Words: Casper Ambrose

Centennial High School’s production of Clue was a good one. Hopefully you were able to catch it, but if you weren’t, here is a review of the show.  It had many strong points and outstanding actors.

Senior Noah Katz, who played the butler, performed incredibly and was very clear in his speaking. He also did a great job of using the whole stage and had very big actions.

Myeves Lucien, who played Yvette the maid, did an amazing, and convincing, French accent, and put on a spectacular performance.

The comedy aspect of the show was executed extremely well by the actors, making it very natural.

Aside from the actors, the set design was also impressive, as it had many moving pieces and actually looked like a house.

Clue was a great choice for this year’s fall play. Taking into consideration the ease of the comedy and the talent of the actors, Centennial’s production of Clue was truly remarkable.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Five Years in the Making: The Decline of Centennial Football

Words: Caleb McClatchey

It all began on a chilly November evening five years ago. Students filed out of Angelo Fortunato Memorial Stadium, celebrating Centennial’s 59-13 win over Hammond to close out the regular season. Seniors on the team like Chase Conley couldn’t help but feel bittersweet despite the blowout win; it was the last time they would put on a uniform and take the field as Eagles. They would finish their careers as members of one of the best Centennial football teams in recent memory, finishing with a 7-3 record for a program that managed only four wins total the previous two years. For the seniors, it was the end of something great. For the Centennial program, it was the beginning of something quite the opposite.

Half a decade has passed since that day. During that span, the Varsity football team has played in 39 games. Of those 39 games they have won exactly one; an away game, quite ironically, also against Hammond. The fact that they have not won a single home game in that span is baffling. How could a program go from being in playoff contention one year to having the worst record in the county over the next five years? There is obviously no clear answer to that question, but what is clear is that the story behind it is very unique.

A combination of depth, experience, and health were all key reasons for Centennial’s strong 2013 campaign. However, a senior-laden team meant that the lineup looked very different in 2014. In addition, two key returning players, Patrick McKinnis and Austin Kraisser, did not play. The Eagles had only four returning starters as a result, fewer than any other team in the county. This dramatic roster turnover did not bode well for Centennial. They were shutout in six games and outscored 452-44 on their way to a 0-10 record. Quickly, it became clear that the team’s hopes laid in its future, not its present. At a certain point, said McKinnis, “our team accepted the 2014 season as a re-development year for all the young talent from JV.”

Mason Smith, a sophomore on Varsity in 2014, was an example of the young talent McKinnis spoke of. In his sophomore year, player turnout was an issue due to the number of seniors on the team previously. To make matters worse, a dismal season only exacerbated the problem in 2015. Most students at Centennial did not have high expectations for the next year and were not interested or willing to try out for a team that had just played one of its worst seasons ever.  Although the players’ motivation to win didn’t decline, said Smith, interest in the team certainly did.

Unsurprisingly, the Eagles did not fare much better that year. Led by new head coach Carlos Dunmoodie, the team finished 0-10 for the second year in a row. The season played out very similarly to 2014, with injuries depleting an already small depth chart. Although it certainly did not reflect in the win column and was of no consolation to the players, it was evident that the talented young core from 2014 was gaining experience and beginning to develop. After being outscored by an average of 40.8 points per game in 2014, the Eagles cut that number to only 26.6 in 2015.

Despite the Eagles’ slight improvement, it was still clear that they were not a good football team. Over the past two seasons, the program had developed a reputation for being the worst team in the county, whether justified or not. As a result, attendance at home games dropped dramatically in 2014 and 2015. By the time the 2016 season came around, the team was not only on a mission to win their first game since 2013, but to win the respect of their peers, too.

The Eagles began the 2016 season with a 20 game losing streak hanging over their heads. It had been over 1,000 days- nearly three years-since that senior night win in 2013. However, the Eagles finally put their notorious streak to rest with a 30-21 season opening win over Hammond.

Eli Ross, a senior on the team, credited their improvement to the dedication of his fellow seniors. “We all had the same mindset, to work harder in every way” he said. According to Smith, what the team truly wanted was not to win one game or even ten, but to “bring back the tradition of a thriving football team” to Centennial.

In a sense, the team did exactly that. Centennial did not win any more games in 2016, finishing 1-9, but there was still something special about the 2016 season. Almost all of the Eagles’ games were relatively close; they only lost three games by more than 20 points. In addition to the team being more competitive than it had been in 2014 and 2015, the opening win generated a renewed level of excitement among students that remained strong throughout the season. Smith remembers how, even in a game against undefeated Howard, the stands were full of Centennial students.

Unfortunately, the energy and excitement from the 2016 season did not, or more accurately, could not, carry into 2017. In late August 2017, just one day before the Eagles were scheduled to play their first scrimmage, the Howard County Public School System announced that Centennial’s varsity football team had been disbanded for the year. The school system deemed that a lack of players- less than 20 showed up for the first few days of tryouts- posed a significant safety risk for the players who had come out.

The announcement made plenty of local, even national, headlines. It was the first time that a Howard County high school was without a football team – ever. The news hit most players hard, particularly seniors. Although the county allowed juniors to play on junior varsity given the extenuating circumstances, seniors ended up losing their entire season as a result of the disbandment.

Centennial’s lost 2017 season was the culmination of a downward trend in turnout that began in 2014. Ever since 2013, when the varsity team had 40-50 players on the team, the Eagle’s roster has been continually shrinking. By 2016, that number was down to 20-25. The Eagles, well aware of this disadvantage, had fought hard over the past three years to overcome it. Nevertheless, they often found out that no amount of heart and passion adequately substituted for the depth they lacked.

“Most of our players played the whole game,” Ross remembered, “ by the end … they were just gassed out.” Finally in 2017, with less than 20 players on the team, the Eagles’ depth was too small to overcome.

Heading into 2018, Centennial students wanted to make sure 2017 stayed an anomaly and didn’t become the norm. In February, Centennial hired Billy Martin as head coach of the varsity team, replacing Coach Dunmoodie. Returning players, combined with some new faces eager to revive the program, gave the Eagles just enough players for a team. Their roster, albeit only around 21 players, was bigger than it would have been in 2017. However, playing on such a small team made players prone to injuries. At one point, recalled junior Sam Baeq, “we had as low as 14 players capable of playing.” In fact, Centennial was forced to forfeit a game against Howard because too many players were injured.

In the games which the Eagles had enough healthy players this season, the results were completely lopsided. Centennial gave up a remarkable 50.7 points per game and didn’t score a single point all season. For the program, which hasn’t seen a winning season since 2013, it was a new low.

Now, five years after its last winning season, there are two ways to look at the Centennial football program. It is either rebuilding, slowly yet resiliently bringing back a competitive varsity team from nothing, or dying, valiantly fighting till its last breath in a battle which has already been lost. The latter view, while bleak, is one that must be at least considered.

There is no denying the heart of those who come out for the Centennial football team every year. Perhaps no other team in the county faces the level of adversity that they do. However, in a sport where depth is critical, there is no amount of effort and dedication which can overcome a lack of participation. Due to a large senior class, participation fell off after the 2013 season. Consequently, the team’s performance declined drastically, and with it, student interest as well. Ever since then, the team’s overall poor performance and low student interest have fed off each other. A bad season leads to lower turnout, which leads to another bad season, and so forth. While it is certainly possible that the program is able to break this cycle and become competitive again, there is also a distinct possibility that it does not. Ultimately, Centennial students, both current and future, will be the ones to decide how the story ends.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.