Varsity Boys Soccer Loses to Mount Hebron 2-0

Words: Joey Sedlacko

Photos: Eliza Andrew


On Friday, October 12, the Centennial Varsity Boys Soccer team lost their fourth game of the season to their rival Mount Hebron High School.

The Mount Hebron defense limited the Eagles’ attack to few scoring opportunities throughout the game to secure their 2-0 victory.

Mount Hebron scored the first goal seven minutes into the first half. The Eagles failed to clear the ball after a cross by Mount Hebron was sent in near the front of the goal, and a Mount Hebron player tapped the ball in to put the Vikings up 1-0.

Despite giving up the early goal, Centennial settled into the game and kept their composure.

Throughout the rest of the first half, the Eagles went on the attack and applied pressure on the Mount Hebron defense. Two shots went just wide of the post for Centennial, and a header off of a free kick nearly went in, but the Mount Hebron goalie was able to save the ball.

The Eagles went into halftime trailing 1-0.

In the second half, both teams struggled to find their rhythm offensively, and did not have many scoring chances.

However, with 15 minutes remaining in the game, a Centennial defender committed a foul in the penalty box, granting Mount Hebron a penalty kick. Mount Hebron was able to capitalize on Centennial’s defensive error by scoring the penalty kick and going up 2-0.

The Eagles’ efforts to accomplish a comeback fell short as the Mount Hebron defense was able to hold onto their team’s lead and win the game.

The Varsity Boys Soccer team will be taking on Oakland Mills High School at home in their next game of the season on October 16 at 5:30pm.


For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial’s Varsity Girls Soccer Victorious Over Mount Hebron Vikings

Words: Delanie Tucker


On Friday, October 12, Centennial’s Varsity Girls Soccer team took on Mount Hebron High School, coming out with a 3-1 victory.

Both the Eagles and the Vikings played hard, but in the end, the Eagles possessed the ball better, only letting up enough to let Mount Hebron get through their backline once.

Centennial’s goals came from sophomore Lindsey Han, junior Carolina Pellegrini and senior Courtney McVicker.

Since the game took place on a Friday night at the same time the football team would typically be playing, the marching band and Centennial’s cheerleaders performed.

The marching band celebrated their senior night prior to the game.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Howard County School Board Narrows Redistricting Options

Words: Delanie Tucker

The Howard County School Board is in the process of resolving the overpopulation of several Howard County schools.

In a recent Board Meeting on October 11, 2018, the board met for the second time this academic year to discuss redistricting options for upcoming school years.

Caroline Walker, Executive Director of Program Innovation and Student Well-Being, presented and explained several options to relieve the overcrowding of Howard County schools, particularly focusing on Howard High School and Centennial High School.

The options consist primarily of voluntary changes, some for only a portion of the school day and others for the entire year.

The ideas presented were: a Howard County Community College Shuttle, JumpStart Program at Wilde Lake High School, Project Lead the Way at Marriotts Ridge High School, reassignment, additional ARL courses, and additional sections of work-based options.

The Howard County Community Shuttle would consist of participating students, juniors and seniors staying at their home school for first period to participate in classes such as band or orchestra and then taking a bus to HCC. The students will take and receive credit for college-level courses, as well as finish out their graduation required classes.

Students would be picked up by bus from their home school and be taken to HCC. These buses, though, would cost $9,000 a piece if they were to travel to Centennial or Howard to pick up students.

The problem presented with this option, pointed out by Sandra French, a member of the Board, was that music classes are not during first period, and not all classes can be moved to first period to fit the needs of certain students.

Walker predicted, based off a previous survey, that 40-60 students would participate in the HCC shuttle.

The JumpStart program at Wilde Lake High School would require students to transfer to Wilde Lake in order to participate.

It has an estimated price of $250,000, which would vary depending on the number of participating students.

This particular program is directed towards students interested in performing arts and film production. The arts program at Wilde Lake is looking to progress, and offers better opportunities for interested artists. The estimated participation for this is 15-20 students from each school.

Project Lead the Way, on the other hand, consists of a Biochemical Academy and a Computer Science Academy.

Again, this option would require a school transfer, this time to Marriotts Ridge High School.

Additionally, Walker presented an estimated price of $63,000, which is a combination of material and training for all academies.

The option of reassignment, previously known as open enrollment, would give students free reign to transfer to either Glenelg High School or Marriotts Ridge High School. A problem presented with this, though, is that students would have to provide their own transportation.

A positive with this option is that it would cost nothing to implement.

Additional sections of work-based options would help to decrease overcrowding during the day. Examples are GT intern/mentor, apprenticeship, and work release, all of which would help upperclassmen get real-world experience.

The problem with this, though, is the more students that enter the program, the more teachers they will need. A new teacher would cost the board $84,000.

Ideally, the Board would like to implement most, if not all, ideas at once. Their concern revolves around the question: where will the money come from?

The last option to fix overcrowding issues, presented by Anissa Brown Dennis, Chief Operating Officer, was redistricting in the form of boundary changes.

Her original intent was to present all plan options, which included: 2017 Feasibility Study Plan, 2017 Attendance Area Committee Plan I and II (August and September), Community plans as identified by Board members, and Howard High School small feeds.

The Board, however, voted to discontinue the presentation after the 2017 Feasibility Plan, and instead had conversation about small feeds.

Their votes were primarily based around the fact that, in a previous meeting, they had voted to not change school boundaries for the upcoming school year, so the presentation did not seem necessary at that moment.

The Board will begin making decisions in regard to the 2019-2020 school year in a meeting on October 18.

In a previous meeting on August 23, there was an idea of temporary and permanent freshmen redistricting, but this idea seems to have been taken out of the conversation, as it was not mentioned in the recent meeting.

This option would have consisted of incoming freshmen being relocated, either for just their freshman year or possibly their entire high school career.

Since no final changes have been made, Centennial students will have to work through the issues overcrowding brings.

Cynthia Dillon, Centennial’s principal who was present at the meeting, is confident in her students’ ability to make their school environment as comfortable as possible, despite the circumstances.

“The distances the students have to travel, while they are in some crowded hallways, they are very creative about how they get from point A to point B,” Dillon stated at the meeting. “They are also using their time. They are walking with a purpose, they are being efficient with how they get from point A to point B and we have not identified a problem with students arriving to class tardy.”

Ellie Zoller-Gritz contributed with background information, analysis and images for this article.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

National Hispanic Heritage Month at Centennial High School

Words: Jenna Marie Torres

Photos: CHS Wingspan

National Hispanic Heritage Month, which started on Saturday, September 15 and ends on Monday, October 15, gives the Hispanic community at Centennial High School a chance to reflect on their heritage.

The Centennial library staff has displayed books in their hallways to share information about female Latino leaders in celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month.

The display contains books about Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court appointed by Barack Obama; Laurie Hernandez, 2016 Olympic gold and silver medalist; Shakira, singer of “Hips Don’t Lie”; and Eva Longoria, award-winning actress. This gesture, though small, makes an impact on the community.

“By showing that the school recognizes the small community means a lot, especially during times when being Hispanic is viewed as violent and dangerous,” said senior Selaya Smithery, who is Puerto Rican. “These books somewhat destroy the myths put onto the Hispanic communities across all of America.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

PSAT Day at Centennial

Words: Sarah Paz

On Wednesday, October 10, Centennial freshmen, sophomores and juniors took the PSAT, or the Preliminary Scholarship Aptitude Test, which is known better as the practice SAT. Testing started at 7:25 am and finished between 11 and 11:30 am.  

1225 students took the PSAT this year. Freshmen took the 8/9 test, while sophomores and juniors took the NMSQT version of the test. NMSQT stands for National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.

For freshmen and sophomores, this PSAT was practice for future PSAT or SAT tests. For juniors, this PSAT score is sent to colleges and the National Merit Scholarship Program to qualify for scholarship money. Last year, 33 Centennial students were eligible for scholarship money from different colleges.

While the other grades were testing, seniors sat in the cafeteria, editing their college essays and getting feedback from teachers.

The PSAT was a success, and hopes to improve the number of Centennial National Merit scholars for next year are high.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Wind Ensemble Opens The Year With A Fall Concert

Words: Natalie Knight-Griffin

Photos: Eliza Andrew

On the night of October 8, the Centennial band program performed an hour long concert showcasing their fall music selections. The jazz band opened the concert with a seasonally appropriate piece, a jazz rendition of Earth, Wind, and Fire’s September. The bands then played in order of advancement, with Symphonic Band first, followed by Symphonics Winds, and finally Wind Ensemble.

Wind Ensemble had the longest program, playing three pieces ranging from a militant march to a faster paced work. Compositions included Fanfare for Justice, Speedway, and Pas Redoublé. The audience gave a standing ovation succeeding Wind Ensemble’s performance. Despite only four weeks of rehearsal, the band program put on a fantastic show.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.