Category: Feature

A Stellar Scientist in the Making: Nicole Meister

Words: Caroline Chu

On March 24 and 25, The 2018 Baltimore Science Fair was held at Towson University. The fair is run by the Towson-Timonium Kiwanis Club, a local scientific organization that is “cognizant of the need to promote the study of science,” according to its event’s website.

Impressively, Centennial senior Nicole Meister, who competed against a total of 32 other projects, was selected as the recipient of a First Place Division One award for physical sciences.

Her project was centered on machine learning. Meister aimed to study the improvement in accuracy of a neural network that could classify features in x-ray scattering images.

This is not her first go-around in science competitions. She has proven her strength as a young scientist by participating in the Technovation Challenge, in which she and her team coded, marketed, and pitched an original app; by utilizing Arduinos, a computing platform, to record solar panel energy output; and by studying collision avoidance for robots.

Winning first place in the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium adds to her list of accomplishments.

Symposium Nationals will be held the first week of May, and The International Science and Engineering Fair is scheduled for the second week of May. Meister will be participating in both events.

From Baltimore Science Fair website

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Meister accepts her award at the Baltimore Science Fair.

Michelle Bagley, Meister’s Gifted and Talented Intern/Mentor teacher, has been teaching her for four years. This period of time has given her sufficient information to characterize Meister as both intelligent and modest.

This modesty translates to her being a wonderful team player.

“She is always one to be encouraging to others in their work, ask probing questions, and offer advice,” Bagley stated.

Meister will take these traits with her to college, where she plans to study either computer science or electrical engineering.

Throughout the years, Bagley has been appreciative of her ability to help students reach opportunities outside of the classroom. The Intern/Mentor class at Centennial has allowed her to apply this concept, but she has gone even further in encouraging students to apply to competitions like those Meister entered.

Bagley raved, “I have seen students take their research from high school and turn it into a patented product, continue their research in college and beyond, and become successful contributing adults. The fact that I can be a small step in their journey is what I love best.”

Appreciative of Bagley, Meister articulated, “She is so much more than just a teacher to me because she has been so supportive in these past years. I couldn’t thank her more for everything she has done [for me] and all that she has done for the Centennial community.”

When posed the question as to what she has learned in high school that will translate to a successful career and life, Meister stressed the importance of pushing oneself to try new things. This has allowed her to grow as a person.

Through her experiences in competition and in Centennial High School itself, this drive has allowed her to become more confident as a public speaker and to improve her writing skills.

Sometimes all that’s needed is the decision to take the first step to try something new.

“By pushing myself to try new things, I found interests in activities and subjects I never would have imagined,” Meister concluded.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Juniors Suit Up for Practice Interviews

Words: Maddie Wirebach

Photos: Harshitha Sayini

For weeks, juniors have been preparing for a rite of passage: junior interviews. Every year the junior class drafts resumes and dresses up for the mock interviews, a requirement to graduate, in order to prepare for real life interview situations. Originally, the interviews were supposed to be during the last week of March, however due to snow days, they took place this week on April 9 and 10.

The interviewers, typically various community members, sit down with each student and ask them interview-style questions. These questions range from goals and aspirations to favorite books or movies.

During the interview, the interviewer records notes on a feedback paper which is later handed back to the student. The paper covers criteria such as eye contact, sociability, and the quality of the resume.

Many students go into the interviews nervous, so the sense of relief once finished is like no other. To all future juniors: a firm handshake and a smile goes a long way!

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Lauren Marcotte: A Force on Centennial Softball

Words: Joey Sedlacko

Photos: Zach Grable

Recently, sophomore Lauren Marcotte gained national recognition for her outstanding performance in high school softball. She was named a 2018 high school softball player-to-watch by USA Today.

“It was an honor to be recognized,” Marcotte stated.

Last year, as a freshman, Marcotte had a stellar season on the varsity softball team. Marcotte finished with a league-leading nine home runs and a .697 batting average, and set a state record for triples in a season with 10. In addition, 28 out of her 53 hits were for extra bases and she batted in 39 runs. Last season, Marcotte broke six school records including the batting average record, which was held since 1982. Marcotte’s remarkable freshman season landed her a spot on the 2017 Howard County softball all-county team.

Marcotte worked hard to improve her skills during the offseason. She plays for her travel team, the Beverly Bandits, which is a softball organization based out of Columbus, Ohio. The team competed in tournaments and showcases during the fall.

“It was hard to get together with my team since the girls are spread out over the country,” said Marcotte.

As a result, Marcotte has a batting coach in Virginia, does conditioning at a local training center in Elkridge, and practices with a few local teams. Marcotte’s work ethic and commitment to getting better in softball is incredible.

The upcoming softball season is just about underway and Marcotte has put high expectations on herself following such a great freshman year.

“On a personal level, I am striving to break the records I set as a freshman and improve upon my overall play,” she said. “We have a great group of girls with a lot of talent and I believe Coach Grimm and Coach Maria will take us far this season.”

Marcotte has a special level of talent, and it has not gone unnoticed by college scouts. As a sophomore, Marcotte is already verbally committed to play Division 1 softball at Penn State University. She visited many different campuses, but decided that Penn State was the right school for her.

“All the help and support from God, my coaches, my family, my teammates, and my friends have gotten me to the place I am today.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

New Schools Being Built in Howard County

Words: Delanie Tucker

Photo: Howard County School Board

The Howard County School Board is making major preparations for the upcoming expansion, building a 13th high school.

On March 8, 2018, the Howard County Board of Education voted to continue with its Mission Road Site for the school, according to Howard County Public School Systems website. The intended opening is to occur in 2023.

The location for the site is 8601 Route 1 Chase Land Subdivision, a spot that will hopefully hold both the previously mentioned high school and an elementary school at some point in the future. The land covers 77 acres, definitely big enough to hold two schools.

The construction of the building is anticipated to begin in December of 2019 and to be completed in September of 2023. The project is estimated to total $124 million once it is finished.

Prior to the board deciding on the Mission Road site, there was discussion between building the school there or at Troy Park. Originally, there was concern that there would be problems due to Mission Road being near an active quarry, but the board seems to have put that problem aside.

There are no details yet about which Howard County middle schools will be distributed to this high school.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Brightens Up Hallways with Inspire Murals [VIDEO]

Words: Maggie Ju/ Photos: Zach Grable/ Video: Julia Stitely

In the few days preceding spring break, clusters of New Forms art students could be seen painting colorful murals on the walls. Bearing inspiring messages, their work brightens the high-stress environment Centennial students are accustomed to.

The project had been scheduled to begin on March 22, but due to school cancellations, it was postponed until March 27.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

EXCLUSIVE: Up to Code? How ADA compliance throughout the county affects students and their high school experience

Words: Meghan Moore

Photos: Laila Abu-Ghaida

How ADA compliance throughout the county affects students and their high school experience=

For decades, Centennial High School has been a home for students with disabilities. Whether it be blindness, or other physical handicaps, Centennial has provided a place for these students to receive the best education possible.

However, because Centennial was built prior to 1990, when the Americans with Disabilities Act became law, accommodations have been provided for these students on an as-needed basis, often leading to challenges that have potentially compromised their experience at Centennial.

The Americans with Disabilities Act became law in 1990. This civil rights law prohibits discrimination against those with disabilities in all areas of life: employment, housing, transportation, and most importantly, schools. ADA compliance ensures that people with physical disabilities are granted public accommodations. School systems nationwide are expected to comply with the regulations set forth by the ADA. However, what about the schools that were built prior to 1990?

The Howard County Public Schools System has 12 high schools with another to be built in 2022. The oldest high school is Howard High School, which opened in 1952. Centennial began construction in 1976, and was completed and opened in 1977. This was nearly 20 years before ADA became law. Not only are these older schools not built to modern ADA compliance, but they are only required to maintain standards for facilities built before 1990. This means that the standards of these schools don’t correspond with the most current regulations.

Centennial principal Claire Hafets stated that schools do not have to meet current regulations once they meet the standards from the year they were built. In addition, the Office of Civil Rights decides when schools meet those regulations, and that varies throughout different high schools.

“Obviously [compliance] looks a lot different here than it does at other schools that are newer,” Hafets stated.

Hafets explained that little things like doors to classrooms begin to stick and become more difficult to open; however, Pierre van Greunen, HCPSS Safety and Risk Management Officer, explained that oftentimes the county is not aware of these seemingly minor issues until an inspection is completed. Van Greunen went on to explain that once they find complications, they are then repaired.

“Many times we are not aware that they [the doors] are not working properly until an inspection has been done. They are repaired or replaced upon learning of their ineffectiveness…inspections by the State of Maryland Office of Equity Assurance and Compliance for ADA and Title IX occurs every 10-12 years,” he stated.

Hafets said that when the school receives a request for accommodations, it sends the request to the county level where it is processed.

“We complete a form and request the accommodation from the appropriate office– Grounds, Facility, Carpentry, etc.,” she said.

Mark Hanssen, an art teacher at Centennial and parent of a student in a wheelchair, did not share the same opinion as van Greunen in regard to the doors. According to Hanssen, his son has had continuous problems with the doors at Centennial. He mentioned that his son has gone through “numerous” wheelchair wheel replacements due to the doors at Centennial.

“He can’t push hard enough for the door not to hit his chair… but it’s his ‘normal,’” Hanssen said.

There are some advantages to being an older school when it comes to ADA regulations. Centennial has larger classrooms, and wider halls for students to navigate, as well as more space between bookcases in the media center. But since Centennial is overpopulated by about 200 students, that extra space in the halls doesn’t really make a difference. Besides, the negatives of the situation outweigh the positives.

Auditoriums in schools like Marriotts Ridge and River Hill have wheelchair-accessible ramps leading up to the stage. Centennial only has steps. Although it seems that older schools like Centennial are always at a disadvantage when it comes to compliance, van Greunen noted that HCPSS does not determine what one school needs based on what another one has.

“Comparing a school like Centennial to [newer] Marriotts Ridge is not an apples to apples comparison. They are different designs built in different years,” van Greunen continued. “Instead, [HCPSS] determine[s] if Centennial is meeting the needs of the students and staff in that building just as we determine if Marriotts Ridge and every other school is meeting the needs of students and staff.”

Van Greunen believes that the county takes a proactive approach when making accommodations for students by working with staff as well as the families of students who require specific accommodations; he also mentioned that general compliance is not always what works best for students.

“General compliance isn’t always the solution that is required to meet the needs of individual students,” he said. “This is why school staff work alongside maintenance staff and the family to ensure that any additional accommodations above and beyond ADA compliance are met.”

Hanssen’s experience has been different.

“That quote [van Greunen’s response] is not characteristic of my experiences,” Hanssen stated.

Hanssen shared that he has only spoken to someone outside of Centennial about his son’s situation two times. In addition, he felt that his perception of Centennial’s compliance was “skewed” due to issues at Noah’s middle school.

“There were a lot of promises made for the building and for accessibility, and they were just put off until he left; accommodations were never enacted.”

However, Hanssen felt that Hafets is supportive and does what she can for his son.

“Ms. Hafets has been very cooperative… when the problem’s brought up, she sends the stuff out and we’ve had people come in [to fix them],” Hanssen said.

In addition to Hafets, Karol Moore, a physical therapist for HCPSS, who has been with Noah for nearly 10 years, is a big support for the Hanssens.

“She’s been the person that’s the most involved with Noah…[Moore] always comes around to find out what she can do. She’s always been a voice, and advocate for Noah,” Hanssen shared.

Van Greunen mentioned that ADA standards do not necessarily always require the accommodations in each building.

Hanssen.

HCPSS has taken a very adamant stance in favor of equity for all students. According to  the HCPSS Strategic Call to Action, as published on the county website, there are four overarching commitments, one of which being “an individualized focus supports every person in reaching milestones for success, [where]…each and every student receives a high-quality education through individualized instruction, challenges, supports and opportunities.”

Van Greunen noted that this is a driving force of their focus.

“We are ensuring that our school buildings meet the needs of every student,” he said.

According to HCPSS Policy 6020: School Planning/School Construction Programs, “The Howard County Public School System (HCPSS) employs sustainable design construction that supports educational program needs and creates a safe and nurturing environment for students and staff within allotted budgetary resources.” Essentially, this policy ensures that all schools prove to be a safe and nurturing environment regardless of when they were built.

“It’s true that newer buildings are constructed with many accommodations that were not required in 1977,” van Greunen shared, “we overcome that by working closely with Centennial staff and families to make modifications to the building that allow for a safe and nurturing environment to be created.”

Hanssen once again shared that this was not his experience when dealing with staff at the county level.

“It’s not ideal, it’s not perfect. There have been some improvements made, but for my son, he’s the only manual wheelchair user in the school. His experience… intrinsically is not the same as other students.”

This exclusive piece is featured in the February issue of  The Wingspan click here to see the full issue!

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

One Down, Two to Go

Words and Photos: Sydney Beck

On February 16 and 17, the Centennial Varsity and Junior Varsity wrestling teams competed in the county tournament at Mount Hebron High School. Team captains senior Jacob Blyukher (138) and junior Jason Kraisser (145) finished the county tournament strong, finishing first place in their weight classes. Junior, Matt Demme (170) finished counties in sixth place.

Freshman, Chris Lee finished his first year at counties in fifth place. Although only first through fourth place is guaranteed a spot in the regional tournament, if a wrestler has accumulated enough points throughout the season they are able to move on to regionals.

The Junior Varsity finished off the season competing in the county tournament. Freshmen, Abaad Shaik (106) finished his year winning third place, Elijah Ruiz (113) placing fourth, and Danny Corazzi (113) placing fifth overall in the tournament.

Varsity wrestlers Jason Kraisser, Jacob Blyukher, and Chris Lee continue on to the regional tournament on February 23 and 24 at Severna Park High School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.