Category: Announcements

McCarthy Gets the Gold

Words and Photo: Delanie Tucker

On January 27, 2018 Centennial’s Mike McCarthy received his Gold Belt in karate. He was awarded this belt from the American Academy of Martial Arts after hard work in the academy. Along with the belt, Mike received a certificate outlining his accomplishments.

Mike was very excited to show off his belt along with his certificate. When asked about the accomplishment, he even commented, “[Getting the belt] was crazy hard and I am proud.”

A Sweet Surprise: Krispy Kreme Announces Opening in Catonsville

Words: Sarah Kruhm

Nothing compares to the feeling of pure satisfaction when first biting into a fresh doughnut, and nothing tastes quite as good as the original Krispy Kreme. This spring, Krispy Kreme will open a new location in Catonsville. Previously a McDonald’s fast-food restaurant, the store will be established at 6447 Baltimore National Pike. This ideal and convenient location is only eight miles from Centennial High School, situated east of U.S. Route 40 in Baltimore County. The advantageous distance is a huge triumph for the Centennial community, which has not had a store this close since the Krispy Kreme in Columbia closed in 2009.

Senior Sydney Grossman disclosed her love for Krispy Kreme doughnuts and revealed how she is a very dedicated fan.

“As a kid, I went to Krispy Kreme every week with my family,” Grossman said. “They serve the best donuts in the entire universe.”

Founded in North Carolina in 1937, Krispy Kreme has established numerous store locations nationwide and worldwide. Known for its red “hot light” announcing fresh, hot glazed doughnuts made in-store everyday, Krispy Kreme is a unique fan-favorite.

The Krispy Kreme in Catonsville is preparing for its grand opening on March 20, and is currently hiring employees for various job opportunities.

“We are hiring applicants who are 16 and older,” General Manager Sherri Koblinsky confirmed. “The best part about Krispy Kreme is hiring a great team and building a family.”

Koblinsky hopes to positively impact the community through various fundraisers and to enlist the community’s support for these public programs.

Senior Allison Brown expressed her enjoyment for Krispy Kreme and her excitement towards the store opening.

“I can’t wait for this new location in Catonsville!” Brown exclaims, “I have three gift cards I can finally use.”

As students start to struggle through the beginning of the second semester, Krispy Kreme will provide a sweet salvation for students to help relieve their stress and sorrow.

“I have been hoping that one would open near us again. I will definitely be making the trip to Catonsville to visit my favorite food establishment,” Grossman confessed.

If you are interested in applying for a position, or wish to learn more about the store opening, visit or contact Krispy Kreme Catonsville through Facebook. For more information about the Krispy Kreme franchise, visit krispykreme.com.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial’s Vintage Voices Club

Words: Sarah Kruhm

On Saturday, February 17, Vintage Voices will perform a special Valentine’s Day compilation at Brighton Gardens of Columbia. The performance will occur at 2:00 p.m., and it will include classic songs that reflect the holiday’s theme: “I Can’t Help Falling in Love with You,” “Sweet Caroline,” “Build Me Up Buttercup,” “Footloose,” and “Fly Me to the Moon.” Although the performance occurs at a private senior home away from the public eye, students are always welcome to join and participate in the club and in its performances.

Sophomore Maddie Hasson is one of the co-presidents of the club, and she happily praised its impact on the community. “Being in Vintage Voices is a lot of fun,” Hasson gushed. “Performing for senior citizens is always rewarding, especially when they sing along with us! Overall, being the club is a very special experience.”

If you would like more information about Vintage Voices and its events and how you can join, email vintagevoiceschs@gmail.com or visit Ms. Borowski in room 908.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Aquila Announces Their Upcoming Coffeehouse

Words: Natalie Keane

Aquila, Centennial’s Literary Magazine, is holding a coffeehouse in the school’s cafeteria on Thursday, February 15, from 2:30 to 4:30. The event will feature musical performances from Centennial’s student community. The admission is $5 per person, and all money received is put towards the production of the magazine. Food and drinks will be provided.

Final submissions to Aquila are due on Friday, February 9. Art, writing, and photography can be submitted; writing pieces must not exceed 2,000 words.

To enter your pieces for review, the submission page can be accessed through the magazine’s website, centennialaquila.weebly.com. You may submit as many pieces as you want for review to be in the print magazine.

If your submission is accepted, you will receive a free copy of the magazine issue with your piece featured in it. For any questions, please contact Ms. Mancini in Room 203.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Delta Scholars Announces Food for the Soul

Words: Maggie Ju / Photos: Camryn Desai

On Friday, February 9, the Centennial Delta Scholars will hold their fourth annual Food for the Soul, Words for the Heart event from 6 to 8 p.m. in the cafeteria. In observation of Black History Month, there will be cuisine and student performances that are connected to African American culture. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door, and can be purchased from Mrs. Holt in Room 501.

The Delta Scholars Program is an honor society for the empowerment of African American girls. Food for the Soul, Words for the Heart is the Centennial Delta Scholars’ signature event.

“They created the event to bring awareness of the many African American contributions to history,” teacher sponsor Lisa Robinson said. “Each year the aim is to expose myth, stereotypes, and miseducation, replacing it with historical facts often omitted from our history books.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Merriweather Post Pavilion Collapses

Words: Delanie Tucker

This past weekend, on January 13, the Merriweather Post Pavilion roof collapsed in the early morning.

According to Washington’s Top News, the roof collapsed at around 2:30 on Saturday morning. Thankfully, due to the time of the accident, no one was injured. The pavilion was being raised 20 feet as a part of a renovation but was not completed as originally planned.

After months of the roof being lifted to its anticipated height, it had finally reached the full 20 feet and was very close to being put in its final position.

Although this incident was obviously a major setback in the original plans, a new roof will be built, and the 2018 season will go on as planned.

Seth Hurwitz, a chairman of I.M.P, who is also operator of Merriweather Post Pavilion, told Top News, “Last night, in the middle of our months-long roof raising operation, the winds of fate prevailed and decided that, instead of simply raising the roof, we should go ahead and build a new one… Everything will be ready for season opening.”

Brian Bassett, the Senior Communications Strategist for the Howard County Public School System, is fairly confident in the fact that the pavilion will be up and fixed in no time for graduation.

“We have been in contact with Merriweather Post Pavilion and it does not appear that the roof collapse will impact high school commencement ceremonies. We will continue to stay in contact with Merriweather officials as plans are finalized and the new roof begun,” Bassett said.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Those Who Don’t Celebrate Christmas: What’s the Holiday Season Like?

Photos: Minah Mubasher and Harshitha Sayini / Words: Caroline Chu

Symbols of Christmas are everywhere. Blow-up figures of Santa dotting lawns, Christmas tree cookies sold at chain restaurants, and wreaths covering neighborhood doors are all commonly-seen images.

These symbols represent a vast majority of American beliefs. According to Gallup, 75% of Americans identify with a Christian religion. However, not everyone celebrates Christmas. This statistic seems to suggest that 25% of Americans, a sizeable portion of the United States, do not celebrate the holiday.

Members of this religious, or non-religious in some cases, minority may feel left out during the holiday season because of the fact that such an emphasis is placed on Christmas in American society.

Some of the people that fall under this blanket religious category are Amirah Elgendy, Jake Horen, and Zoha Fatima, all Centennial students.

Elgendy is a Sunni Muslim, and feels as though society is not as inclusive as it could be. She states, “[The holiday season] does not tie all religions together as well as it could because holidays like Hanukkah and Kwanzaa aren’t given as much attention during this time.” Horen, who is Jewish, echos similar beliefs in that he interprets holidays other than Christmas as still represented, but not to nearly the degree Christmas is.

Fatima, a Shia Muslim, sees things in a harsher light, believing that Muslim holidays are not represented well throughout greater American society, but also believes that this representation will increase over time.

However, the period from late November to January 1 is still overwhelmingly positive through the eyes of a few non-Christian Centennial students. Elgendy points out the fact that many people who aren’t Christian still celebrate Christmas, and that therefore, many Americans are tied together through widespread celebration.

Horen is similarly convinced that the holiday season, a season in which he is able to be an individual and celebrate Judaism, “brings everyone together.”

To him, this feeling of unity may ironically spring from the differences between groups of people. He believes that “everyone does their own thing in the holiday season, and who am I to try and change things up?” After all, these differences in viewpoint are crucial for the formation of identity and individuality.  

It’s important to remember that different religions still value many of the same principles, and time with family is an example of this. Because school is held during Eid, a Muslim holiday which can fall between November or December, Fatima is unable to visit Muslim family members living in London or Pakistan, which she wishes she could do.

During the same holiday, Elgendy does a special prayer with her family in the morning, and always celebrates with them by eating out. Like Elgendy, Horen uses a holiday he celebrates — Hanukkah — to connect with his family, lighting the menorah and saying prayers with his close relatives.

Concepts like closeness with family may allow for an expansion in recognition of winter holidays other than Christmas. Elgendy has a hope for the future of the United States of America: an expansion in knowledge of differences. She comments, “[Americans should] stay educated on the multiple other religious holidays during the holiday season, and recognize them.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.