Tag: Eliza Andrew

Centennial Boys’ Varsity Soccer Dominates on Senior Night

Words: Joey Sedlacko

Photos: Sara Ferrara & Eliza Andrew

The Centennial Boys’ Varsity soccer team faced off against opponent Long Reach High School on Thursday, October 10, defeating the Lightning 4-0 after a strong all-around performance from the Eagles.

Before the game, senior players and their families were recognized for their commitment to the soccer program. Seniors Ryan Zaman, Kyutae Sim, Darian Avery, Zach Grable, Rob Hix, Elliott Keppler, Radwan Mezghanni, Toby Moser, and Kieran Senisi were all honored.

The Eagles’ offense took advantage of scoring opportunities in the first half. Juniors Bryson Baker and Kevin Salazar, as well as sophomore Sammy Molz, each scored a goal to put the Eagles up 3-0 going into halftime.

The defense for Centennial continued their solid play from previous games and held their opponent to zero goals for the third straight match.

A goal by senior Elliott Keppler sealed the victory for Centennial.

“It was a very good team win. We made smart decisions and played calm in the back. We also controlled the midfield well and finished our chances,” said Baker.

With this win, the Eagles are now 5-3. In their next game on October 15, the soccer team will face River Hill High School, the toughest opponent in the county.

 

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Decades Day and Twin Day Collide at Centennial

Words: Joey Sedlacko

Photos: Eliza Andrew & Noorie Kazmi

On Thursday, September 26, Centennial students wore their best matching outfits for Twin Day. However, the seniors rebelled and rocked their finest throwback clothes for Decades Day. Tomorrow, students will be decked out in their class color for Color Day.

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Seniors Dominate In Centennial’s First Ever Men’s Volleyball Game

Words: Natalie Knight-Griffin

Photos: Eliza Andrew & Adithi Soogoor

During Eagle Time on Wednesday, September 25, the gym flooded with students anticipating Centennial’s first ever boys volleyball game. Following the structure of the traditional powder puff game, eighteen junior and senior boys went head-to-head.

With people packing the student section, a display of USA-themed school spirit and excited chants could be seen.

Juniors began with an advantage as Paul Russell took the stage. With a 12-5 lead, the seniors needed to make significant strides in order to catch up. Senior Shawn Kruhm had a strong serve, scoring over the juniors and beginning their comeback.

“They had us in the first half,” said Kruhm. “We played really well, it was a well deserved win.”

After 20 minutes of intense back and forth play, the clock ran out and the seniors won 29-27. The senior student section cheered as they flooded the gym floor, creating a dog pile on the court.

While the boys played with great sportsmanship and intensity, Centennial’s first ever men’s homecoming volleyball game will go down in history as a triumphant win for the Class of 2020.

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Centennial Promotes Action Against Climate Change

Words: Sarah Paz

Photos: Eliza Andrew

On Friday, September 20, Centennial students walked out of their classes at the beginning of
third period to support the global climate change movement. About 200 students gathered
together outside the school and protested for 15 minutes.

To encourage fellow students to take action against global warming, the walkout was initiated
and run by the Young Democrats club. The leaders, Lexi Fang and Sonia Saini, spoke at the
beginning of the walkout urging listeners to take a pledge to do their part in saving the Earth.
They turned the microphone over to students who agreed with the club’s advocacy. The walkout
was successful as it gathered a community of environmentally conscious students to advocate
for their beliefs.

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Centennial Boys’ Soccer Nearly Complete Comeback Against Rival Mount Hebron

Words: Shawn Kruhm

Photos: Eliza Andrew

After taking a day to recover from a tough loss to Howard on Tuesday, the Boys’ Soccer team hit the road and faced off against their toughest rival. 

On Thursday, September 12, Centennial tied Mount Hebron in the team’s closest game thus far. The final score was 2-2 after the teams battled in not one, but two overtimes as neither team could pull away. 

Neither team was able to get anything going offensively in the opening 20 minutes. Shortly after that Centennial was able to take the first lead of the game.

With 18:40 remaining in the first half, junior Bryson Baker made a solo run down the left sideline. After beating his defender, Baker shot a rocket to the top right corner to beat the goalie. The visitors section, filled with Centennial students and parents, immediately rose to their feet to applaud the team.

Despite gaining momentum from Baker’s goal, Centennial’s defense was unable to hold the opposing offense as Mount Hebron scored before entering halftime. 

Both teams got off to another slow start to open the second half. Tremendous defense played by both teams resulted in equal possession time. 

Mount Hebron took the lead towards the middle of the second half and Centennial struggled to answer.

With under two minutes remaining in regulation, the game seemed nearly out of reach. After a fundamental tackle from senior Zach Grable, Baker dribbled the ball down the field. As defenders closed in, Baker made a flawless pass down the left side. 

Junior Tim Woerner received the ball and switched it towards the middle of the field. After dribbling past two defenders, Woerner found himself eight yards out with only the goalie in front of him. Woerner dropped the ball in the top left corner, giving the goalie no chance at a save.

The sea of white from Centennial’s student section erupted. The team had done the unexpected. Woerner scored the equalizer goal when just about everyone had lost hope. 

The game extended into two overtimes in which no one was able to score. The final score was 2-2. 

“I’ve been dealing with numerous injuries, so much so that this moment seemed impossible,” said Woerner. “Some people may just look at it as the equalizer, but for me this means everything, and this is just the beginning.”

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Principal Cynthia Dillon Reflects on Her First Year

Words: Natalie Knight-Griffin

Photo: Eliza Andrew

In a school of 1,612 students, a single face passes by new principal Cynthia Dillon. She says hello, just as the student smiles with a welcoming invitation to their club event later in the week. With a beaming look she says, yes, of course!

Dillon, after almost 180 days of being principal of Centennial High School, has attended nearly every student event possible: from band concerts, to It’s Academic tournaments, art galleries, sports games, and Worldfest. She has devoted the majority of her time here to the students– their individual needs, requests, and ideas.

“The hard part was when a kid would say to me in the hallway, ‘Hey, can you come to this tonight?’ I kind of felt like I couldn’t say no… my job is to be here for you and serve you,” Dillon assured. “If there’s a kid who wants you to come, you’re there.”

The average high schooler, as Dillon has noticed, yearns for change. She is fascinated by Centennial’s students, who yearn for school inclusion, safety, and success.

Such student-driven change can only make for an exciting, yet overwhelming year. As principal, handling such drive can become a challenge.

With only seven hours in a school day, and an exponential number of people to oversee, Dillon recognizes the powerful position she holds, and how different it is from being principal of a middle school.

“I quickly figured out what I do, because there are twice as many of you, twice as many teachers, twice as many parents, but I still have the same 7-hour day,” said Dillon. “So when you guys come to my door, I’m stopping what I’m doing.”

Out of the plethora of memorable moments from the past school year, the ones that stuck out most to Dillon were the individual, intimate conversations with students. The most seemingly insignificant and trivial responses may last a lifetime.

Despite these incredible moments, not all moments have been positive. Such an intensive job can only come with extreme highs and lows, times in which school conflicts feel endless, and parking permits may never be resolved.

“Another thing I care about is equity,” said Dillon. “If we take the parking for example, we asked every high school in the county, what is your process, how do you issue permits?”

In the heights of such student, teacher, or parent frustration, Dillon must sit back and understand her place.

“The hardest thing in the first year in any assignment is stopping and watching. So what I think it should be, may not be what it is here, and just because it’s not what I think it should be doesn’t mean it’s wrong,” said Dillon. “It’s just different.”

Upon walking through the expansive front doors of Centennial High School, Dillon immediately felt a wave of anxiety among the students. What formerly had been only warnings of the competitive nature became reality within an instant. Centennial’s high-achieving reputation does not exist without truth, as she discovered.  Students from ages 14 to 18 crowd the halls in discussion of their grades, SAT scores, AP test results, and anxieties.

“Certain students stress themselves out trying to achieve at such high levels that it’s emotionally unhealthy. I think a big part of this issue stems from students being reticent to talk about their stress.”

Dillon has appreciated every second she has spent in Centennial, learning and understanding the school’s community. Centennial, as she put it, is like no other. Especially different from that of middle schools, high schoolers possess an interest in the community’s well being. Often taken aback by the intensity of student passion, Dillon appreciates student conversation.

“All of a sudden, my primary target customers [students] are advocating for themselves, and coming to the door, whereas middle schoolers will very rarely seek you out.”

In Dillon’s past experience as a middle school principal of 12 years, she learned lessons she thought would be applicable to this new job, but soon realized otherwise. The most significant lessons, recalled Dillon, came from recognizing there was a lot to learn.

“A couple times this year I’ve made decisions like a middle school principal and not a high school principal… and didn’t go and say hey, this is what I’d like to see, how can we make it happen,” Dillon stated. “Once or twice I ruffled some feathers unintentionally.”

In just a year’s time, a lot has changed in Centennial. Most of all, it may be Dillon’s view of her position, and the students who make it possible. An experience many high schoolers can describe as the best of times, and the worst of times, is a year to remember- as Dillon’s legacy has only just begun.

Most importantly, to Dillon, of course, is her relationship with the students. “I think the role of the principal is to serve,” she says.

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This article is featured in the 2019 Takeover Issue.  To see the full issue, Click Here!

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