Tag: Julia Stitely

Sense and Sensibility Interviews

Podcast by: Casper Ambrose, Julia Stitely, Noelle Deal, Keith Hitzelberger, Camryn Desai

Get a closer look at Centennial’s production of Sense and Sensibility with interviews from the director and a lead in the show.

Jacob Traver | Theatre Teacher/ Director

 

Myeves Lucien | Portrays Marianne Dashwood

 

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Interviews With Centennial’s Newest Staff Members

Podcast by: Casper Ambrose, Julia Stitely, Noelle Deal, Keith Hitzelberger, Camryn Desai

The Wingspan media team interviews the newest additions to Centennial’s staff.

Jessica Stockham | Paraeducator 

 

Jacob Traver | Theatre Teacher

 

Darryl Thompson | Security Officer

 

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Bull Run Interview with Coach McCoy

Podcast by: Casper Ambrose, Julia Stitely, Noelle Deal, Keith Hitzelberger

The Wingspan media team interviews Cross Country coach Kevin McCoy on Centennial’s participation in The Bull Run.

 

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One-on-One With Editor-in-Chief: Maddie Wirebach 2018-19

Words: Julia Stitely

In this video, Maddie Wirebach, Wingspan’s Editor-in-Chief for 2018-19, is interviewed by her successor, Piper Berry, about her passion for journalism and what it took to become Editor-in-Chief.

To find all of our videos, click the link below!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDAPq5X7zp8GN4ThdL_9FQw

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Centennial Students Win First Place at the Howard County Film Festival

Words: Julia Stitely

On April 26, the fifteenth annual Howard County Film Festival was held at Miller Branch Library, highlighting students in the area who made their own original films. Over 35 films from 12 schools were submitted to the festival, seven of which were made by Centennial students.

Centennial submissions included: Alone (Dominic Cangialosi), Always With You (Robert Silverstein, Hanna Knight, Seth Crumley, Cole Lashley, Catherine Carlson-Estes), Dreams (Carolin Harvey, Jessie McCarthy, Simone Sabnis), Hey, It’s Me! (Wabii Doti), Parking Purgatory (Sasha Allen, Carolin Harvey, Julia Stitely, Diego Montemayor), Selling Out (Gabe Cabonilas, Nick Baker, Carolin Harvey, Wabii Doti, LeeAnn Fiawoo), and Tubular Psychology-Operant Conditioning (Nick Baker, Hanna Knight, Kieran Newell).

The film that took first place was the only horror entry, Always with You.

Robert Silverstein, a senior and the film’s director, said, “The idea actually started as an action film with the main character being chased into a house by a group of people. We wanted to make the house significant in some way, and we also wanted to have a twist.”

When Silverstein and his team twisted the plot around to what it was for the final film, they compared the film to Edgar Allan Poe’s famous short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart.”

Silverstein stated that they “didn’t base the film around ‘The Tell-Tale Heart,’ but realized their similarities afterwards.”

“Filming got tedious at times due to repetitive shots and very late nights,” said Hanna Knight, a senior and actor in the winning film. “But it was all worth it, especially working with amazing friends.”

When she heard that they won first place at the festival, Knight thought it was surreal at first.

“It was still a little hard to process afterwards,” she said. “We were all really excited that all of our time and effort that went into this film went as far as it did.”

Silverstein recalled hearing the movie being announced as first place and claimed it was one of the best moments of his life.

“It’s always been a dream of mine to make a short film,” he said. “For our first short film ever to win just felt surreal. It took a while for first place to sink in.”

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Dangers of the School Parking Lot

Words: Julia Stitely

Photos: Adithi Soogoor

From the dawn of the school day to the afternoon, students and parents of Centennial are affected by the hardships of the school parking lot. In recent years, the parking lot has been known for being the site of several collisions. Between students running in between cars, ignorance to road signs and the layout of the parking lot, it’s no easy task for even the more experienced drivers.

The accidents, in part, could be caused by the overcrowding in Centennial.

Michael Guizzotti, Centennial’s security guard, expressed his concerns of the parking lot by saying, “We are overpopulated, so it’s not just the hallways that are crowded, it’s the parking lot too.”

“In the morning, it’s not that bad because I get there pretty early so I can get a good spot,” junior Casey Duhon said. “Sometimes I’ll be a little bit late and it could take me five minutes to get to a parking spot because the layout of the lot makes it so difficult.”

Michele Aylaian, mother of two Centennial students, expressed concern for students walking in from the parking lot in the morning.

“When they are late and running between cars, they are at risk of being hit by a driver who doesn’t see them,” she commented. “It’s stressful as a driver because you don’t know when a student is going to suddenly run in front of you.”

Afternoon Bottleneck

Things get hectic for Centennial students who drive to school when the clock hits 2:10. The sudden rush of students makes it easy to lose control in the crowded parking lot, giving the driver only a second to gain control before hitting something in their surroundings.

“Getting out of the parking lot after school is rather scary because everyone is rushing to get home and will cut people off when turning or switching lanes,” said Duhon.

Centennial principal, Cynthia Dillon, stated the design of the lot was not intended for the mass population.

“The lot wasn’t designed for the flow of traffic that comes through in the morning and in the afternoon,” said Dillon. “The way that the lot is marked, the road markings and the signage are not adequate.”

Dillon also believes that another problem that arises in the morning comes from parents letting their kids out in the closed second lane for drop off and in the parking rows themselves.

“People don’t honor the directions from the procedure of dropping kids off,” Dillon shared. “What they will do is pull into the second lane, but also the actual parking row.”

“They will drop their kids off one or two rows away,” Dillon added. “So the kids are walking through cars to get through the door.”

One solution that Dillon and the administrators are looking into is putting new signs up in the parking lot and painting on the roads.

“We have a stop sign on the Centennial side but they don’t have one on the Burleigh side, and they don’t have one on the main way,” Dillon said. “There should be a stop.”

Dillon and the administrators requested the Grounds Department in the Building Services Division of the Howard County system for another stop sign, and the lot is slated to be repainted in the summer.

Parking Permit Problems

In the past week, over 130 cars were found in the parking lot without a parking pass. The owners of these cars were warned that if they are found without a pass, parked on the lot, there would be disciplinary consequences.

Dillion stated the reason they did it in the end of the year rather than the beginning of the year was because of the increase of cars due to juniors starting to get their licenses.

She suggested that, “Families should take note of Safe Driver presentations and plan to attend one proactively. Students and a guardian must attend the presentation annually in order to be eligible for a parking permit.”

Some of the students that are affected are outraged by the situation. Junior Amelia Oliver lives in Old Ellicott City, and it takes her about 30 minutes to go to school.

“I think the passes should be based off where you live,” she said, “because some kids, it is much easier for them to drive. Others can walk.”

The Centennial Film Club found the humor in the parking lot situation by creating a mockumentary called Parking Purgatory and entered it into the Howard County Film Festival.

Senior, Carolin Harvey, with other members, filmed and edited the entry.

“Although our video is mostly comical, it does highlight how crazy our parking lot actually is,” Carolin answered. “The footage we captured of the morning and afternoon definitely captures some of that madness.”

The dangers of the Centennial parking lot continue to be a problem for the staff and students with the overcrowding population and the design of the parking lot. The solutions to these factors are soon to be solved; until then, students and parents are advised to stay alert and focus on the road.

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