Tag: Sara Ferrara

Centennial Basketball Hosts First Round of Playoffs

Words: Shawn Kruhm

Photos: Sara Ferrara

On Friday, February 28, the Centennial boys’ and girls’ basketball teams played in their first playoff games of the season.

Unfortunately, the girls lost to Manchester Valley by a final score of 42-33. 

Centennial was off to a hot start as they led by seven at the end of the first quarter. A breakout performance from sophomore Lauren Pellegrini gave the Eagles an early 21-17 lead entering halftime. 

Despite a near-flawless first half on both sides of the ball, Centennial was unable to hold off Manchester Valley in the final two quarters. 

The Eagles scored just 12 total points in the second half, and let up nine points in the fourth quarter alone. The defensive struggles for Centennial emerged as the team grew tired.

Pellegrini and senior Brook Anderson combined for 20 points, four steals, and 11 rebounds as Centennial suffered a season-ending loss to Manchester Valley.

Directly following the girls’ game, the boys’ basketball team hosted county rival Mount Hebron. The Eagles dismantled Mount Hebron, ultimately winning by a final score of 59-40. 

After back-to-back three-point buckets from seniors Jeong Hwang and Matt Schickner, Centennial started the game on an 11-0 run. 

The Eagles did not look back and led by as many as 24 points. Senior Joey Sedlacko led the team with 16 points.

The boys will travel to Marriotts Ridge on Tuesday, March 3, for the following round of playoffs. 

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For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Clubs Celebrate Valentines Day

Words: Sasha Allen

Photos: Sara Ferrara

With Valentine’s Day here, clubs have decided to take advantage of the season through club sales. Among these are Red Cross and Eagle Ambassadors, who are selling festive treats for students to buy.

Red Cross has been selling carnations for $1 a piece to raise money for the club’s charity activities. With the money, the club will make blankets for veterans and sandwiches for grassroots.

“A lot of people send flowers not just to significant others but also friends and teachers to show their appreciation to them, so it brings an air of community to Centennial,” says Anika Huang, a member of Red Cross.

Eagle Ambassadors has been selling candy grams for either $1 or $2 with personalized notes for the recipient. They use the money earned for events and school spirit activities to benefit Centennial as a whole.

Chris Lidard, a junior, has been active with the sales and is excited to use the money to help the school.

“Almost everything [raised] will be going back into helping students raise up school spirit,” says Lidard. “A worthwhile investment if you ask me.”

As for the candy grams, Lidard enjoys the spirit they bring to Centennial.

“I think the idea of sending some candy and a personal note really helps people connect,” says Lidard. “Even if it’s to a friend or a classmate… [it can] brighten up the atmosphere of the school.”

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For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Boys’ Varsity Basketball Suffers Heart-Breaking Loss to River Hill

Words: Shawn Kruhm

Photos: Sara Ferrara & Melissa Notti

On Wednesday, January 15, the Centennial Varsity boys’ basketball team lost a tough game against River Hill by a final score of 45-41. 

Going into the game, Centennial was ranked first in the county, as they won seven straight games leading up to Wednesday night. 

Unfortunately, the Eagles struggled to knock down shots and play defense. 

Senior Jeong Hwang led the team in scoring as he finished the game with 10 points. Centennial hopes to improve their 9-3 record on Friday at 7:00pm when they host Howard High School. 

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For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan

PLASTIC: Your Evil Best Friend

Words: Natalie Knight-Griffin

Photo: Sara Ferrara

Here we are. A generation of radical, idealistic, and often angry teenagers. We see the way the world has fallen apart under our feet: rainforests cut down, carbon emissions higher than ever, ice caps melting, mass extinction, oceans of plastic. We have been handed this responsibility, this enormous task of reversing hundreds of years of destruction and pollution. But we accept, no questions asked. Because we understand that this responsibility is greater than us.

I never imagined I would be the type of kid you hear about in the news, in the human interest stories after main program hours. The ones that run their own charities at age eight, the ones who are working day and night to make a difference, the ones who make you feel like you’ve done absolutely nothing with your life. My parents watched quietly before making the oh-so-familiar joke, “Why aren’t you trying to save the world?”

Then, the summer before my freshman year, I saw the Earth in peril and suddenly, I was.

My godmother had introduced me to Flow, a documentary detailing the privatization of water and its detrimental effect on both the worldwide class system and the environment. After that, I began spending the majority of my time observing my own post-consumer waste, not to mention that of my peers. The toothpaste bottle is empty and trashed at 6:38am. My best friend’s leftover coffee drink, watered down, is discarded at 11:12am. At 12:38pm, the bell rings and the lunch table is decorated with three Dasani bottles, sandwich bags with half-eaten PB&Js, Go-Go squeezes, and the assumed necessity of our school’s plastic utensils— despite the absence of their use.

At home, I stand in front of the enormous green bin in my complex; it begins to look the size of my apartment. Its opening is a void, a hole yawning for the day’s trash. None of which, I remember, will degrade in my lifetime. Nor the next. Nor the one after that.

We believe we live in a progressive society— but do we?

Awareness of plastic waste and its environmental effect is no secret. It now feels as though the idea of being “waste-free” is a trend. Reusable straws and biodegradable alternatives are now a marketing term. If capitalist America has caught up, why hasn’t the school system? Is Centennial really a self-proclaimed “green school” if we possess the ability to fill an entire landfill on our own?

In Howard County, we have the privilege of not acknowledging our post-consumer waste; to throw away that crumble of paper in our hands, that soda, in a split second, without another thought. We each produce pounds of trash every day. So, in the minds and hearts of our community, why doesn’t it matter? The answer is obvious: this waste does not directly affect us.

The day’s trash will be taken to the landfill. And that’s all we really need to know, right? What you don’t see are the pounds of waste that will never degrade. The billions of plastic materials  that will exist at the bottom of the ocean, in our forests, and in the stomachs of innocent animals for as long as they are alive.

There it was: my big project.

The one that could potentially be the answer to my parent’s fateful question.

Where does the single greatest amount of plastic exist within a high school? Three bins laying on a cafeteria table, each containing an abundance of forks, spoons, or knives.

So it began. I jumped in and invested two months of research into the depths of biodegradable and sustainable utensil distributors. I wrote and sent email after email to the officers at the Board of Education; hoping for traction. Constantly, desperately, always.

Eventually, my Principal Cynthia Dillon aided in landing a meeting from three officers from the Board of Education to discuss the transition away from plastic utensils. We met in the central office of Centennial, with Dillon there to facilitate. Nothing substantive came of the meeting, but I am not discouraged. I will continue to chronicle my research and experiences in a Wingspan series for the 2019-20 school year.

I inform you of this not to point the finger at anyone, nor to deem myself the heroine of this impossible challenge. Instead, I point my question to you.

What are you going to do?

 

This article is featured in the 2019 Winter Issue.  To see the full issue, Click Here!

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan

Centennial Student Section: Drawing a Fine Line

Words: Caleb McClatchey

Photo: Sara Ferrara

The Centennial student section’s behavior during the fall sports season has brought into focus the delicate balance between spirited and unsportsmanlike spectator behavior.

At the Varsity boys’ soccer game against Long Reach on October 10, two Centennial  students shouted in other languages during the game. Aaron Pollokoff, who is Jewish, shouted the beginning of a Hebrew prayer in Hebrew. Kenji Hoang, who is Chinese, said he shouted cheers like “great ball” and “good shot” in Chinese. Pollokoff also stated that Centennial students called out the names of Long Reach players throughout the game.

During the game, an official called a timeout to address the student section’s behavior and gave a warning to them. Afterwards, administrators talked to Owen Burke and Pollokoff, along with multiple other students, about their behavior at the game.

Principal Cynthia Dillon says that it was not simply students’ use of foreign languages that made their behavior inappropriate. She stated that the nonverbal signs accompanying their speech, such as their intonation and body language, “did not indicate kindness.”

“[It’s] not what you say but how you say it that matters,” she remarked.

In addition to the warning against the use of other languages, Burke recalled being told that spectators can’t bark or call out opposing players by name or number.

A few days later, Centennial played another boys’ soccer game at River Hill. Pollokoff says that Centennial students barked and screamed the names of Centennial’s and River Hill’s players.

Assistant Principal Tracy Scaltz, who was present at the game, asked students to stop screaming the names of River Hill’s players and barking. Although a couple of students initially questioned her reasoning, she said they didn’t do so in a disrespectful manner. According to Scaltz, the student section stopped their behavior after she talked to them, but it was apparent that there needed to be a dialogue between students and staff to reach a common ground.

For Scaltz, communication between the administration and student section is everything. “When we communicate clearly our expectations, and the staff and students come up with a plan, the kids are awesome” she stated.

What transpired both during and as a result of these games has led Burke to believe that the administration is “keeping a closer eye [on the student section]” than in past years.

While Centennial’s Athletic Director Jeannie Prevosto agrees that the student section’s behavior wasn’t worse than in past years, she says that inappropriate behavior “appears to have been more apparent this year.” She explained that when the official called a timeout to address it during the Long Reach game, this put it onto the administration’s radar.
Prevosto wants to make sure that the school takes care of any future inappropriate behavior before the officials do and stated that the school will “address everything we feel is unsportsmanlike or violates HCPSS policy for athletic events.”

Pollokoff, however, disagrees with the assessment that the student section’s behavior was unsportsmanlike. He believes that there was “nothing offensive or mean” about what they did.

Likewise, Burke says he doesn’t think “we’ve done one thing over the top all year.”

Prevosto, on the other hand, emphasized the idea that “perception is everything.” Even if a student is not intending to be offensive or mean, their behavior could still be “seen as negative and inappropriate.”

  After the two soccer games, some confusion developed within the student body over what behavior will –and will not– be allowed within the student section at games. After talking with Dillon, Prevosto clarified the school’s stance on certain behaviors.

Barking will be “allowed providing it is used to cheer for Centennial,” said Prevosto. However, if it is “used in a derogatory way to berate, harass, or intimidate opposing players, coaches, or officials, then that will not be allowed.”

With regards to calling out players’ names and numbers, Prevosto stated that “as long as our spectators are cheering in a positive, appropriate manner, we can call out the names and numbers of our players, not the opposing team’s.”

Ultimately, Prevosto says that she wants “everything we say and do to be a positive reflection of Centennial High School.” She is aware of the effect that the student section can have on games, and her goal is to allow as much school spirit as possible while adhering to good sportsmanship.

In a similar spirit, Burke remarked that he and his peers are “just trying to bring back energy and make it fun.”

Despite the recent disagreements between students and administrators over what behavior crosses the line, it is clear that both sides share a common goal: increasing school spirit at Centennial.

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This article is featured in the 2019 Winter Issue.  To see the full issue, Click Here!

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Varsity Boys’ Basketball Takes Down Rival Mount Hebron

Words: Shawn Kruhm

Photos: Sara Ferrara

On Wednesday, December 11, the Centennial boys’ basketball team hosted Mount Hebron High School in their second game of the regular season. The Eagles won by a final score of 66-47. 

A hot start for senior Jeong Hwang gave Centennial an early lead that they never gave up. Hwang scored the first six points for the Eagles and they went on to close out the first quarter with a five-point lead. 

Following a strong defensive performance in the first half, Centennial entered halftime leading Mount Hebron 28-19. 

Despite Mount Hebron’s scoring run to begin the third quarter, they were unable to overcome Centennial’s offensive threats. A phenomenal third quarter performance from senior Matt Schickner had the student section up on their feet. 

With under two seconds remaining in the third quarter, Schickner pulled up from just over halfcourt and nailed a three-point dagger to beat the clock. The sea of white erupted in the stands and Centennial never looked back. His miracle shot stole the momentum after the Eagles allowed three straight buckets.

Centennial did not let up as they scored 20 points in the fourth quarter to seal the win. Hwang led the team in scoring with 15 total points. Senior Joey Sedlacko and Schickner both finished with 11 points.

Centennial hopes to take down Reservoir High School on Friday, December 13, at 7:00pm.

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For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Wrestling Starts New Chapter

Words: Joey Sedlacko

Photos: Sara Ferrara

    The 2019-20 season marks a new beginning for the Centennial Wrestling program. The Eagles start their season this year without four-time state champion Jason Kraisser. It will be the  first season in 14 years that a Kraisser will not be wrestling for Centennial.

However, the team still has valuable Varsity experience. Top wrestlers senior Yusuf Mehboob, juniors Chris Lee, Ibaad Shaikh, and Matt Harris, and sophomore Nick Shapiro all return to the team this season.

On Thursday, December 5, the wrestling team lost their home opener match against Oakland Mills High School by a score of 45-28.

Junior Charlie Schmitt and sophomore Moiz Subir won their match. Also, Mehboob, Shapiro, and Lee were all victorious.

The Eagles had to forfeit a match in three different weight classes which is part of the reason Centennial lost the match.

The wrestling team continues their season on Tuesday, December 10 when they face Long Reach High School and Atholton High School.

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For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.