Tag: Caitlin Martin

Caitlin Martin, Former Wingspan Photographer, Wins Awards at Both State and National Levels

Words: Corey Grable

Caitlin Martin, class of 2013 graduate, has always loved photography, but it wasn’t until 2011 that she really got into it. “I got my first camera, a DSLR, in 2011. I have always liked taking pictures, and I love to focus on equestrian sports, sports in general, and all kinds of animals as well.” She joined the Wingspan photography team last year, and her impact was immediate. Instantly, Martin was taking extremely high quality photographs at some of the most prestigious events such as the Friday night football games, the Volleyball State finals, and the winter musical.  Besides Martin’s supreme picture-taking abilities, she helped out the Wingspan in another key way.

Due to her seemingly limitless knowledge about photography, Martin presented her fellow classmates with a once in a lifetime opportunity to learn from a photographer of her caliber.  A photographer for the Wingspan this year, sophomore Montana Lowe, credits a lot of her success to Martin’s teachings. “Martin’s photos were super helpful, and changed the way I take pictures, and she has changed how the Wingspan photographers takes pictures,” said Lowe. “She was incredibly helpful with teaching me a lot of key points that I didn’t know before this year.”

However, Martin’s success was not only limited to the Wingspan. Martin, along with balancing school and the newspaper, also is a proficient personal photographer. She has been recognized at both the State and National level for pictures she has taken. A picture taken last February of 4-time state champion and Centennial graduate Nathan Kraisser won a state award from Towson University. This picture depicts Kraisser’s arm being raised by the referee after his fourth and final state championship victory.

Another one of Martin’s numerous out-of-school successes is one of the most well recognized photos of the year. In a PTA “Magic of the Moment” photo competition, Martin’s photograph, detailing a child tenderly touching a horse, won 1st place on the State level, after placing high in the county level.

At the national level of the competition, Martin’s picture won an outstanding 3rd place in her category, receiving an Award of Merit. This award is one of the highest honors a photographer can receive. Martin’s friends, family, and fellow Wingspan members are incredibly supportive of Martin and her impressive achievements.

Junior Kris Berry, a member of the Wingspan, said, “It’s awesome that someone from our paper made such an impact on a national level. I think Martin really deserves this award. She is always working hard, and looking for ways to improve herself and the others around her.” He added, “I know for a fact that the photography branch of the Wingspan has definitely improved with her on the staff.”

Martin is not staying for a second year with the Wingspan, as she has graduated a year early. She will attend Howard Community College in the fall, and then transfer to Johnson & Wales University.

Martin also runs her own website that showcases many more of her spectacular photos. Click Here to view some sports, theater, and other great shots, or Click Here to view her video production business website.

 

 

 

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Words: Paul Didwall

Photos: Caitlin Maritn

It seems that one of the worst insults to give a production of any type is to comment on how good it was – and then say “for a high school performance.” Fortunately, the Centennial Theater’s production of The Wizard of Oz did not appear as a high school production. The cast alone gave the spring musical a professional appearance, and the intelligently designed sets added the finishing touches.

Of the five public showings of The Wizard of Oz – March 21-23 at 7 PM, March 23 at 2 PM, and March 24 at 3 PM – three were sold out completely.

Upon entering the packed auditorium, the guest were greeted by the incredibly talented pit orchestra. Then when seven o’clock finally arrived, the main lights dimmed once, and the auditorium went dark just a few moments later.

Centennial’s Theatre Department took a different approach to backdrops this time around. In all the previous plays, musicals, and other performances I have seen at CHS, the scenes were decorated by a few generic backdrops that changed a few times throughout the performance. In many cases, these backgrounds were fine, as they applied to the various scenes. The Wizard of Oz had many frequent scene changes, which were dealt with by projecting various backdrops at the back of the stage, as needed. What really set this method over the top was the ability to include a degree of animation in the scenes. A twister actually appeared on the screen, and Dorothy – played by Anne Marie Demme – had the thoughts that occurred during her trip to Munchkinland spiral on the backdrop.

A slightly unexpected addition to the musical was the participation of an actual dog. Honest expectations for Toto were a stuffed animal, so the actual terrier was a nice surprise, and really set the show apart.

Flight has been a theme in previous CHS productions, yet has never appeared to the same caliber as it did in The Wizard of Oz. It is widely known that The Wizard of Oz involves lots of flight, so the theatre department incorporated it. When Glinda, played by Jillian Loeffler, arrived on stage, she was flying – as witches do. The same was true for Sarika Reddy, the West Witch, when she appeared to learn of her sister’s death. The flying entrance of the two witches became the norm through the play, but another flight addition was added later. The flying monkeys also flew on to stage when trying to capture Dorothy.

Overall, the 2013 Spring Musical was possibly one of the best performances I have seen at CHS to date. It is wonderful that the entire theatre department – actors, stage crew, flight crew, a/v crew – always excite and impress the audience with their performances.

Caitlin Martin Wins MPTA Photo Competition

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Congratulations to Wingspan Photographer Caitlin Martin on her victory at the state level of the Maryland PTA Reflections Competition. Caitlin’s photograph, “Wonderstruck” (pictured above) won first place, and will now move on to a national competition. The theme of this year’s competition was “The Magic of the Moment,” which Caitlin’s picture captured. A monetary award was given for the victory, and Caitlin will compete for scholarships at the national level.

Winter Pep Rally

Words: Caroline Lawrence

Photos: Caitlin Martin

How best to boost school spirit?  The SGA and school administration chose to solve this problem by holding a pep rally on Friday, February 22.   In sixth period, underclassmen and upperclassmen were entertained in two separate shifts by the dance companies, jazz band, cheerleaders, and various clubs and sports teams.

 

CHS Eagles Varsity Basketball Defeats Stephen Decatur High School

Words: Anna Mitchell

Photos: Caitlin Martin

Ellicott City, MD – On Tuesday, February 26, the 14-8 Eagles boys’ basketball team began their journey in the playoffs.  They faced off against the 13-0 Stephen Decatur High School Seahawks. Stephen Decatur, a 3A school, is located in between the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay in Berlin, Maryland. Though it is unusual for a team to travel two and a half hours and over the Bay Bridge to play a match, the Seahawks made the lengthy trip to Centennial for the first round of playoffs.

With tip-off at 5:30 PM, there was a lot of positive energy in the gym. The student section was packed with almost every student wearing red. The fans began with a lot of intensity and loud cheers, as the Eagles snatched offensive rebounds and converted layups. They went on an early run, holding the Seahawks to single digits for almost all of the first quarter. The score at the half was 23-17, Eagles.

The power in the gym decreased as the game progressed. The Eagles extended their lead to fluctuating around twenty points at some moments in the match. The Seahawks could not keep up with the Eagles’ strong crashing of the boards that allowed them multiple offensive rebounds. The Eagles also intercepted many of the Seahawks’ passes to get wide-open layups or another scoring possession.

Although the Seahawks cut the Eagles’ lead to 5 points with two minutes remaining in the fourth quarter, the Eagles weren’t going home after their defeat that began from the match’s tip-off. The final score was 53-37, Eagles.

The Stephen Decatur Seahawks headed home on their long bus ride after a tough loss. Though the end of their season, the Eagles will progress to the second round. On Thursday, February 28, the Eagles will travel to River Hill High School to face off with their boys’ team at 5:30 PM.

Chaos in the City: Ravens Parade

Words: Kyle Simpson, Ravens Corespondent

Photos: Caitlin Martin

Baltimore, MD – The Ravens’ Vice President of Public Relations, Kevin Byrne told owner Steve Bisciotti on the way home from New Orleans that he should expect 30,000 people at the parade yesterday. Bisciotti asked what they would do if there were more than 30,000. The answer: “We’ll have to open up the upper deck.”

That is where I found myself yesterday after sitting in about an hour of traffic, in my seats in the upper deck that I sat in for seven games this year. Section 521, row 23, seat 9, 10, and 11 with my brother and father. But I was not there for a game yesterday, I was there to watch my team hoist the ultimate goal: the Lombardi trophy.

I did not see the parade that preceded the ceremony in person, but I watched it on the Ravens Vision board on one end of the stadium and I saw thousands of fans greet the team with “Seven Nation Army” and cheers, following them down Commerce, Howard, and Russel streets leading to M&T Bank Stadium, where they disembarked their floats and lined up for one last introduction onto the field. They entered the field to “Where the Streets Have No Name” by U2 like they always do, with the fire walls and fireworks. It was incredible to see the team that had went through so much, come full circle with Lombardi in hand.

They did not do personal introductions, aside from a few exceptions. The first few being Steve Bisciotti, Dick Cass, Ozzie Newsome, and John Harbaugh. They only had two players personally introduced. The first being the Super Bowl MVP Joe Flacco, who walked out with his son. The second being Ray Lewis, who walked out and hoisted the Lombardi trophy over his head. He handed the trophy off, picked up a piece of grass from a cardboard box, and did his famous dance for upwards of 90,000 fans (final estimates are 80,000 in the stands with and additional 10,000 on the field) per baltimoreravens.com. Ed Reed met him where he was standing and the two defensive legends did Ray’s dance together. Not to be out danced, Jacoby Jones did his own version of the Squirrel with Ray.

The crowd went nuts.

Gerry Sandusky introduced five speakers to the podium.

Joe Flacco took his little boy to the podium and said “Baltimore, we did it… this was for you guys… We’ve been through a lot this year– a lot of highs, a couple lows. and you guys stood there through it all. Like you always do… you are a special group and we love you.”

An emotional Ray Lewis took the podium. “Baltimore! There is no nothing better in the world, there is no place on this earth, that is better than Baltimore. This city, this city. We believed in each other since Day One. From 1996 to now. We believed in each other, Baltimore.”

That we did, Ray. That we did.

Ed Reed took the podium and led Raven Nation in “Two Tickets to Paradise” and “Seven Nation Army” before saying “Hey Baltimore! the best team, the best team in the world is right here. Right here. No better team right now. Right now, nobody can beat these boys. Not us. Not in the world.”

At the end of the ceremony, John Harbaugh took the podium and led the 90,000 members of Raven Nation in a cheer.

“What’s our name?” he asked.

“RAVENS!” the crowed cheered back.

As the highlights from the Super Bowl rolled, I sat in section 521, row 23, seat 10 and just smiled. The team that walked onto the field with the Lombardi reminded me of why I love this team, why Baltimore loves this team: it’s because this team loves Baltimore, too. It is easy to stick with a team through three-game losing streaks, blowout losses, and uncertainty when the team honestly cares about the city they represent.

And looking forward to the uncertainty of the offseason for the Ravens, I will still believe in the boys in purple. Just like Ray said.

And there is only really one way to put it, like Ed Reed said:

“From New Orleans to Baltimore, who dey say gonna beat dem Ravens?”