Tag: Zach Grable

Centennial JV Wrestling brings home a win, Varsity not as fortunate against Hammond

Words: Minah Mubasher

Photos: Zach Grable

The Centennial High School JV wrestling team started the season off great, defeating the Hammond Golden Bears 48-34 on Thursday, December 6. Unfortunately, Varsity was not as lucky, ending the night with a final losing score of 46-21.

    JV player, Ibaad Shaikh made excellent pins on his opponent and won his match. “I think we did better than last year,” said Ibaad.

    Varsity player, Jason Kraisser scored the first few points for the Varsity team. His teammate, Chris Lee, had all eyes in the audience on him in his multiple-round match against his opponent. The tension in the gym was high, but Lee came through and won his match. However, his teammates were not as fortunate.

    Both the Eagles and the Golden Bears worked very hard at last nights’ match, and we can be sure to expect more greatness. With this year’s wrestling team, Centennial is definitely going to be on its best game.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Life in Guatemala: An Interview with Olga Cobo Raymundo

Interview: Minah Mubasher

What was your life like in Guatemala?

My life was bad. Guatemala was dangerous. The gangs there killed my friend, Lucia. She lived next to me and was my best friend. She would always buy me gifts and was very nice. We would do our homework at my house.

Would you like to go back to Guatemala?

I cannot go back to Guatemala. I want to stay here with my father, mother, and my little sister. I also have many new friends here. Even if I wanted to go back, my mother does not have money for a plane.

How have you been adjusting to life here in Maryland?

When I came here, I was 12 years old. The people here were very nice to me. Living here is easy because there is less fear and it is safer here.

What do you miss most about Guatemala?

I miss my house in Guatemala. I also miss my sister, brother-in-law, niece, and my grandparents. My grandpa is very sick. He cannot walk and only has a couple more years to live. My mother sends him money to help pay for his medicine.

What do your friends in Guatemala think America is like?

My friends Elena thinks life here is fun. My other friend, Albaro wanted to come to America with me. His father is here and it is safer. All my friends think America is rich and that there are famous people everywhere.

Do you like life in America or Guatemala Better?

I like it here better. Everything here is better. The school is better and so are my friends. Even the food here is more tasty. There are many more options in America. I didn’t like the meat in Guatemala. The meat vendors did not wash it very well.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan

Student Athletes Sign Off

Words: Delanie Tucker

Photos: Zach Grable

On Wednesday, November 13, seven of Centennial’s student athletes made their college intentions public.

Each of the seven had already committed to their college of choice, where they will go to continue their academic and athletic careers.

Although they all signed at the same time, none of the seven will attend the same college, and their sports of choice differ.

The students that signed are: Jackie Sterenberg to Frostburg State, Alison Betler to Towson University, Abby Doff to McDaniel College, Marissa Lagera to Monmouth, Courtney McVicker to Marshall University, Ashley Molz to American University, and Jason Kraisser to Campbell University.

Both McVicker and Molz will be attending college to play Division 1 soccer, as they played together on Varsity for Centennial.

“Committing was really rewarding for me because I grew up wanting to play collegiate soccer,” McVicker expressed. “It made me feel like all of the effort and training I had put in finally paid off.”

She continued this by stating how she decided on a college.

“Choosing Marshall was a simple decision. As cliche as it sounds, the first time I stepped on campus I had a ‘this is it’ moment; I knew it was where I wanted to go to school.”

Betler is one of the few that chose to stay local. She will attend Towson University, a school in Maryland, for cross country.

Lagera, attending Monmouth, will continue her athletic career, playing D1 lacrosse.

Lagera is very proud of her accomplishments, and thanks everyone that helped her achieve them.

“Having my friends, family, and coaches [with me] made it even more special, because they too have worked so hard for me to be able to have this and I loved being able to share my success with them.”

Another committed student was Doff, who will play collegiate field hockey.

Sterenberg, a volleyball player, is another that felt it was important to find a college that is relatively close to home.

“I was looking all up and down the east coast and something about Frostburg made me feel comfortable and at home,” Sterenberg commented. “I am most excited to contribute to the team as they compete division 2 for the first time and be part of a welcoming atmosphere.”

Lastly, Kraisser, the only male athlete, will be attending college for wrestling.

“Something I learned as an Eagle is to always persevere,” Doff expressed. “I will definitely be taking that with me through college.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Immigrants Share Their Stories

Words: Javiera Diaz-Ortiz

Photos: Zach Grable

Imagine being raised in a certain culture, speaking a familiar language, feeling tied to a community and knowing no other way of life. For many students, immigration turns their entire lives upside down. Positive and negative experiences alike, immigrants experience major changes throughout the transition process.

Senior Anne Vicari was born in Brazil and immigrated to the United States in 2010, at the age of nine. Her native language is Portuguese, so the first task she had once moving to Maryland was becoming fluent in English.

However, Vicari claimed that learning to speak the language was not the most difficult part because English “is not as complex as Latin rooted languages.” Rather, the most challenging part for Vicari was leaving her family behind.

Vicari immigrated with only her mother, which meant saying goodbye to the rest of her family.

“The most difficult part of adapting was learning to be away from family,” she stated.

On a more positive note, Vicari feels grateful for having been given the opportunity to gain a new perspective.

“The [best] part of immigrating, other than being able to experience a different culture, was going back to Brazil and telling all my friends and family about my new life,” added Vicari.

Another senior at Centennial, Helen Huang, immigrated from China a few days before her sixteenth birthday.

Like Vicari, Huang’s first language was not English, but her English class in China facilitated this part of the process for her. However, conversational parts of the English language were a factor she had to spend more time learning.

“I [didn’t] know how to respond to ‘what’s up’ or ‘how are you doing’,” she remarked.

One major difference that Huang noticed between China and Maryland is the structure of classes in high school. She noted that in China, she had only one assigned classroom, not several destinations to go to each day.

“I think it’s harder to make friends [since] we usually have only one period together,” Huang added. Even though it was difficult at first, Huang has met many new people at Centennial and maintained several friendships.

“The best part is I [am able to] experience a totally different culture,” claimed Huang, “Immigrating actually [broadened] how I view the world.”

Similar to Huang’s view of immigration, senior Sera Lim, who immigrated from South Korea at the age of seven, stated that she is more “aware of the different foods, activities, traditions, and even historical values not represented in Korean culture.”

Lim’s first language was Korean, and it became difficult for her to communicate with others once first arriving.

Lim has since made an interesting observation between her “old” life and her “new” life. She noted that the sense of community is different.

“In Korea, transportation was very easy and children could walk to a supermarket by him/herself; unlike the United States, where the car is the main source of transportation,” noted Lim.

Vicari, Huang, and Lim all showcase the rush of positive and negative aspects which immigrants are met with. The immigration process shapes an individual and transforms their view of the world.

“Getting to learn and experience a new culture was one of the most interesting parts about immigrating,” Lim expressed, “From immigrating, I am more open and aware of the different foods, activities, traditions, and even historical values not represented in Korean culture.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Atholton Defeats Centennial Varsity Volleyball

Words: Joey Sedlacko

Photos: Zach Grable

On Tuesday night, Centennial Varsity Volleyball lost to Atholton High School in straight sets – 25-23, 25-13, 25-20 – marking only their second in-county loss (8-2, 8-5 overall). This was a tough match-up for Centennial as they were going up against an undefeated Atholton team (10-0 in county, 13-0 overall).

In the first set, Atholton jumped out to an early 8-3 lead, forcing coach Michael Bossom to call a timeout and regroup with his team. However, Atholton continued to have control over the game, and they extended their lead to 14-7.

Centennial rallied from the deficit and tied the game at 19-19, due to seniors Jackie Sterenberg and Nicole Attram’s several kills.

The Eagles did everything they could to win the set, but Atholton managed to take the first set, finishing with a score of 25-23.

Atholton carried their momentum from the first set into the second. Atholton propelled themselves to a 25-13 victory after quickly gaining a 10-2 lead over the Eagles early in the set.

Keeping their composure, Centennial bounced back and played a back and forth game with Atholton all the way until the end of the third set.

Both teams were unable to gain a decent-sized lead over the other, until Atholton scored three straight points, making the score 20-17. Centennial responded to this well, and the Eagles answered with their own 3-0 run to tie the game 20-20. However, Atholton was able to win the last five points and defeat Centennial 25-20.

The Varsity Volleyball team looks to end the regular season with a road win versus Glenelg on Thursday, October 25, at 5:30pm.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial’s 2018-2019 Pancake Breakfast

Words: Zach Grable

Photos: Eliza Andrew

On Saturday, September 29, Centennial’s annual Pancake Breakfast was held in the cafeteria.

This fundraising event helps Centennial PTA and Boosters.

There were many students and parents in attendance, as well as the Oriole Bird.

 

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.