Tag: Emily Hollwedel

Student Exchange Day Highlights Differences in Schools Across County

Words: Sasha Allen and Emily Hollwedel

Photos: Zach Grable

On Wednesday, March 27, six students from Long Reach in the Howard County Student Exchange program visited Centennial to see what it was like to go to a different school.

Overall, the response to the exchange day was positive. “It’s not too different from Long Reach, but it’s very unique,” said Elijah Saunders, a junior at Long Reach. However, Sanders did notice a social difference.

“Everyone [at Centennial] seems to get along with each other pretty well, but at Long Reach people are pretty distant,” said Saunders.

Other Long Reach students saw a different side of the social interaction at Centennial. Jada Sanders, a visiting student, decided to ask James MacLellan, Centennial freshman and her guide for the day, about the rumors she had heard.

“I heard some stuff about how it’s ‘clique-y,’ and I asked [James] if that was true and he said in some ways, yes because people like to stick with their own groups and sometimes don’t talk to other people.”

“Despite what group people associate with, [Long Reach students] talk to other people,” says Sanders. She was excited to participate in the exchange day, and was glad she went. “I wanted to have an open mind and see what you guys did on a daily basis… I heard things [about Centennial] but I went to see for myself what it was.”

The visiting students did come to an agreement on the biggest difference at Centennial, and Long Reach student Sui Cin highlighted this variation between the schools. “The diversity of the school, that is very different. I think that here, it is very distinguished, but if you go to Long Reach it’s so mixed… here you can see [what types of] people go [to Centennial].”

Sanders also seemed to notice this difference. “Looking in most of the classes and in the halls, demographics [are very different than at Long Reach].”

Cin also seemed particularly impressed by the fine arts at Centennial. “This school has many fine arts. I was watching theatre and you guys were so passionate about it.”

Rachel Henry, a senior at Wilde Lake and the creator of the program had the chance to visit Glenelg on Wednesday as well. “The halls are very quiet at Glenelg. You won’t hear chatter…it’s just silent.”

However, she, like the Long Reach students, noticed the difference in diversity.

“[The swap day] was the first time in all of my years of schooling I had a class without any African American people. Though I tried not to notice race as much, it was inevitable.”

On April 3, Centennial students will travel to Long Reach and Glenelg students will go to Wilde Lake. Although all of the students noticed differences between their schools and the exchange school, they were able to come together and share their experiences at the two schools, and students look forward to the next exchange day.

 

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

High School Students to Participate in First Ever Howard County Student Exchange Day

Words: Sasha Allen and Emily Hollwedel

*Editor’s Note: April 1, 2019–This article has been modified to reflect the correct date of the second exchange, April 3. A previous version stated that it was April 4.*

About a year ago, Wilde Lake senior Rachel Henry was going about her usual day when she was struck with an idea.

I originally thought of the differences between specifically Wilde Lake and Glenelg,” Henry shared. “I would sit and look at race, [Free and Reduced Meals], and test score comparisons. They’re so drastically different that I don’t even know how it’s possible with a school only 20 minutes away. I sent an email to a few Board Members, and the principals of both Wilde Lake and Glenelg to see if I could go to Glenelg for a day.”

It wasn’t easy. Henry encountered some difficulties in trying to implement her idea. “It was immediately shot down by my principal, who was supportive but certain it was against policy,” recalled Henry. “A month or so later, I got a call in the front office from Cindy Drummond, advisor of Howard County Association of Student Councils, saying that the board latched on to my idea.”

The idea of the program is simple: students are given the chance to connect with new people and experience different schools in Howard County.

On Wednesday, March 27, participating Wilde Lake students will travel to Glenelg, and Long Reach students will go to Centennial. On April 3, participating Glenelg students will go to Wilde Lake, and Centennial students will go to Long Reach. On the days of the exchanges, the students will attend classes until fifth period, where they will meet with school liaisons and debrief.

Henry highlighted the differences between these schools, specifically between Wilde Lake and Glenelg. “When I see 46% African American, 25% white, and 13% Hispanic, in Wilde Lake’s stats, I think diverse. But when I look at Glenelg’s 76.2% white, and a number over 5% can’t even be conclusive for any other race but Asian, at 11%, I think of segregation.”

Henry is no stranger to being perceived as different from others.

My dad is black and my mom is white, and I honestly don’t know if places other than where I’ve gone are as accepting of that,” she said. “I am also a practicing Jew, so in that aspect I am also different.”

James LeMon, Director of Community, Parent, and School Outreach in Howard County, expressed his excitement for the program to be in place. He was vital in the implementation of Henry’s idea.

“I’m just excited that we are taking a student’s idea and we are going to make it happen,” LeMon stated. “I think it is a great opportunity for the kids to experience a day in the life of a different school, culture, get to meet some other students.”

As for the goals of the program, both Henry and LeMon hope the experience will unify the schools and students.

What I want for students, including myself, is to stop thinking of pre-conceived notions about schools in our own county,” shared Henry. “I go to Glenelg on Wednesday, and to be completely honest, I’m terrified. Four boys got arrested there last year for racist and anti-semitic graffiti. Being mixed, and Jewish, those hate crimes directly pertained to me.”

LeMon had a similar notion about the ideas that students in Howard County have about other schools.

Every school has a different culture, and I think the goal was just to experience the day in the life of another student in Howard County,” said LeMon.

Henry’s ideas are now in effect in not just her own school, but in multiple. She hopes that this can end up being a county-wide opportunity.

This group of 20 students who get to experience another school for the day are going to bring back this information to their schools and spread it,” said Henry. “I just hope lasting impressions are made, and people are truly in this experience to see what it’s like to be at different schools.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Boys Basketball Loses to Reservoir, 56-54

Words: Emily Hollwedel

Photos: Delanie Tucker

On February 12, the Centennial Boys’ Varsity Basketball team took on Reservoir High School. It was also the team’s Senior Night. After the seniors from the drill team and basketball team walked onto the court and took photos, the game began.

At the tip-off, Centennial struggled to make shots and stand their ground to keep the ball in play. Four fouls were given to both teams, and the first quarter concluded with Reservoir in the lead, with a score of 13-8.

Second quarter was more of the same, but Centennial managed to score more points after a time out that allowed them to pick up speed. A boost of motivation came along with an impressive steal from Centennial to make a basket. The quarter finished 25-17, and Reservoir was still ahead.

The rise and fall of energy kept the third quarter score rather steady. Eventually, the points climbed up to 41-31, and Reservoir remained in the lead.

The Eagles kept up the fight in the fourth quarter. Several fouls shots allowed the Eagles to catch up with two minutes left, and a timeout helped the team greatly. Several impressive three-pointers set up an opportunity for the win, but in the end, the game finished with a final score of 56-54.

Centennial will take on the Lions at Howard High School on Thursday at 5:30pm.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Students Dress for Snow Day During Winter Spirit Week

Words: Emily Hollwedel

Photos: Jenna Torres

On Wednesday, December 19, students dressed up for Snow Day, where students and staff wore blue and white to celebrate the upcoming winter break.

Some students wore coordinating shirts and pants, were draped in blankets, or sported ski goggles.

Thursday’s spirit day is Ugly Sweater Day, where participating students are encouraged to wear the ugliest sweaters they own.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

CHS Girls’ Varsity Basketball Defeats Long Reach

Words: Emily Hollwedel

Photos: Eliza Andrew

Last Friday, the Varsity Girls’ Basketball team faced Long Reach for the third game of the season. The final score was 57-49, with the Eagles taking the win.

“We played great as a team,” said junior Rasa Welsh. “We moved the ball really well and made the right adjustments as the game went on.”

Welsh also added that one of the best contributors to the game was a collective effort of staying calm under pressure. “We had nothing to lose playing this game,” Welsh said. “We knew that Long Reach was a good team, but [also that] we could handle it.”

In terms of preparing for the next game, Welsh noted that it was going to be difficult. “We really have to work on our passing, getting back on transition, and taking control of the game.”

Varsity Girls’ Basketball will take on the Reservoir Gators at home on Monday, December 17, at 5:30 pm.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Three Halloween Movies Through the Decades

Words: Emily Hollwedel

The room is dark, the only light a dimly lit screen. No one dares to move, or speak, or even breathe. Hearts pound, and breaths hitch. Suddenly with a flash of an image and a shriek of noise, the people on the edges of their seats lurch backwards in a rush of fear. This is exactly how horror movies are supposed to make people feel- thrilled, anxious, and terrified all at once.

For decades, a wide variety of horror movies have been created to frighten people all across the world. Here are three iconic films from the horror screen just in time for Halloween.

Halloween – 1978

During a time when horror movies were considerably haunting, Halloween, directed by John Carpenter, tells the tale of Michael Myers, an escaped killer, and his attempts to attack a high school student named Laurie Strode on the chilling night of October 31. This film keeps the audience holding their breath throughout incredibly tense, dark scenes that follow. Viewers will find themselves wondering if they, too, are being followed, and if the monsters they’ve read about are truly fiction or not.

Scream – 1996

Wes Craven’s Scream was a breath of fresh air to horror in a time of sequels and repetitive nature. It follows a masked killer’s string of murders in a middle-class town usually resembling paradise. Sidney Prescott, a girl attending the local high school, is attacked multiple times by the killer, while coping with the one-year anniversary of her mother’s death, and during a party finds herself trying figure out who is behind the rising body count. The quick wit and charm of this movie comes into play through its self-awareness and sarcasm. Though somewhat cliché, it’s still amusing, and every moment is thrilling.

It– 2017

Andrés Muschietti’s adaptation of the classic Stephen King novel provides a recounting of seven outcast kids in the town of Derry, Maine, as they search for the interdimensional alien creature named Pennywise the Dancing Clown in the horrific summer of 1989. The film deeply contrasts the previously made mini-series by splitting the movies between youth and adulthood, as well as keeping up with the increasing quality of CGI that was not available in the 90s. With every element of a twisted coming of age story, the changes in the kids who are forced to face their fears head-on are shocking, but prominent by the end of the film. The truly frightful jumpscares and psychological pressure, speckled in the popular 80s nostalgia is high throughout each scene, making it both fun and petrifying for viewers.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Golf Wraps Up State Tournament

Words: Emily Hollwedel

On the morning of Tuesday, October 25, the Centennial Golf team arrived at University of Maryland College Park to begin states.  The results were unexpected.

Ty Sams, who did not place in the qualifiers, placed twelfth in the Boy’s 3A/4A Division Tournament.  He advanced on to the playoff round and tied for seventeenth.

Sams shot 162 strokes over the two days of the tournament.

Kenny Chaplain placed fifth in boys districts, and Morgan Taylor placed third in the girls districts to qualify for the state tournament.  Both ended up below the cut line in both divisions.  Chaplain shot 87, while Taylor shot a 94.

The Centennial team as a whole placed twelfth in states with a score of 359.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.