Tag: Harshitha Sayini

Art Overload

Words: Eliza Andrew / Photos: Minah Mubasher and Harshitha Sayini

At the end of every school year, the hallways are decorated with the most captivating art pieces created throughout the school year. Mrs. Collins, Mr. Hansen, and Ms. Elliott have collected the many amazing pieces crafted by each art class, to show off their phenomenal talents. These art pieces are on display in the hallway on the walls next to the cafeteria, as well as outside of the auditorium. The display truly embodies the amazing talent that lies within the walls of Centennial. 

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Celebrates Diversity at WorldFest

Words: Maggie Ju/ Photos: Harshitha Sayini

The CHS National Honor Society and the Dance Honor Society presented WorldFest, a celebration of student and staff diversity, on Thursday, April 12 from 5 to 9 p.m. It was an extremely successful event, and students could be seen throughout the school.

Most students milled around the cafeteria for the first two hours, where clubs set up to sell cultural cuisine. The Pre-Medicine Club offered mango lassi, the National Chinese Honor Society sold fried rice and dumplings, and ramen was available at the Korean American Student Association table.

In the media center, many students gathered to listen to a panel. The speakers included Dr. Calvin Ball, District 2 councilman; Mona Eldadah, co-founder of Next Wave Muslim Initiative; and Neveen Kurtom, chair of the Howard County Commission for Women. They discussed intersectionality, being part of multiple minority or disadvantaged groups.

Another popular activity was making crepes in the culinary classroom, which drew so many people that the strawberries quickly ran out. Latecomers simply piled chocolate sauce and whipped cream onto their crepes until the ingredient supply was exhausted.

The final event of the evening was a series of performances in the auditorium. Performers socialized with others before the show, admiring their decorative clothing. The theatre room, where they prepared, was a spectacle of glittering jewelry and vivid fabrics.

Representing India in the fashion show, freshmen Anushka Parab and Pratulya Chengala said that previous experiences helped them relax.

“I’m wearing modern Indian attire for the fashion show,” Parab said, doing jazz hands. Her bold red and gold apparel rivaled the bright colors of the dancers’ skirts. “I haven’t done anything like this before, but I’ve gone onstage to dance, so I’m not that nervous.”

Dances, set to music ranging from Bollywood to Blackpink, captivated the audience. Other performances had roots in West Africa, China, and Ireland. It wasn’t just physical talent that was highlighted. Centennial students Mallika Kadabha, Sindhoori Mukka, Arya Bhargav, Avni Patel, Amaka Agbim, and Bibiana Phan all choreographed their dances, an exceptional achievement.

There was a fashion show as well, where students displayed their cultural dress as Mr. Stephen Doff explained the origins. Clothing from all around the world was showcased. Nigeria, Iran, and Haiti were only a few of the countries represented.

Freshman Sarika Kapadia flaunted a turquoise Indian lehenga for the fashion show. After the fashion show, she said of her experience onstage, “It was quite scary, but once you get used to it, you realize that you’re in a supportive and cultural community.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Juniors Suit Up for Practice Interviews

Words: Maddie Wirebach

Photos: Harshitha Sayini

For weeks, juniors have been preparing for a rite of passage: junior interviews. Every year the junior class drafts resumes and dresses up for the mock interviews, a requirement to graduate, in order to prepare for real life interview situations. Originally, the interviews were supposed to be during the last week of March, however due to snow days, they took place this week on April 9 and 10.

The interviewers, typically various community members, sit down with each student and ask them interview-style questions. These questions range from goals and aspirations to favorite books or movies.

During the interview, the interviewer records notes on a feedback paper which is later handed back to the student. The paper covers criteria such as eye contact, sociability, and the quality of the resume.

Many students go into the interviews nervous, so the sense of relief once finished is like no other. To all future juniors: a firm handshake and a smile goes a long way!

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Students Participate in Nationwide Walkout

Words: Maddie Wirebach / Photos: Laila Abu-Ghaida

This morning at 10:00 am, Centennial students participated in the nationwide walkout for gun reform.

Braving the bitter temperatures, students held up homemade signs with cries for policy change for seventeen minutes, one minute for each victim in the shooting in Parkland, FL. Sophomore Julia Stitely displayed her support for gun reform with her sign, reading “How many lives have to be lost for you to listen?”

Another sign read, “Fear has no place in our schools.”

Senior Sophie Lovering, who helped make the walkout possible for Centennial students, was very pleased with how things worked out.

“I was pleasantly surprised by the turnout. All of the students who decided to participate were respectful, understood the purpose of the walkout, and returned to class in a timely manner,” said Lovering.

Lovering encouraged the students participating to utilize the power of social media to show their support.

“I know that the pictures/videos taken and conversations started will effectively communicate our pro gun-control message to the local, and hopefully national, community.”

Harshitha Sayini, a junior, admired the power in each poster.

“It was nice to see all the posters made by students encouraging gun reform.”

Sophomore Yousif Omer led a powerful chant, reassuring students that they matter, and so do their opinions.

Flyers were handed out detailing the student-organized trip to the March for Our Lives on Saturday, March 24, in Washington D.C.

 

For more information about the planning of the event, read here: https://chswingspan.com/2018/03/12/lovering-plans-chs-backed-walkout/

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Those Who Don’t Celebrate Christmas: What’s the Holiday Season Like?

Photos: Minah Mubasher and Harshitha Sayini / Words: Caroline Chu

Symbols of Christmas are everywhere. Blow-up figures of Santa dotting lawns, Christmas tree cookies sold at chain restaurants, and wreaths covering neighborhood doors are all commonly-seen images.

These symbols represent a vast majority of American beliefs. According to Gallup, 75% of Americans identify with a Christian religion. However, not everyone celebrates Christmas. This statistic seems to suggest that 25% of Americans, a sizeable portion of the United States, do not celebrate the holiday.

Members of this religious, or non-religious in some cases, minority may feel left out during the holiday season because of the fact that such an emphasis is placed on Christmas in American society.

Some of the people that fall under this blanket religious category are Amirah Elgendy, Jake Horen, and Zoha Fatima, all Centennial students.

Elgendy is a Sunni Muslim, and feels as though society is not as inclusive as it could be. She states, “[The holiday season] does not tie all religions together as well as it could because holidays like Hanukkah and Kwanzaa aren’t given as much attention during this time.” Horen, who is Jewish, echos similar beliefs in that he interprets holidays other than Christmas as still represented, but not to nearly the degree Christmas is.

Fatima, a Shia Muslim, sees things in a harsher light, believing that Muslim holidays are not represented well throughout greater American society, but also believes that this representation will increase over time.

However, the period from late November to January 1 is still overwhelmingly positive through the eyes of a few non-Christian Centennial students. Elgendy points out the fact that many people who aren’t Christian still celebrate Christmas, and that therefore, many Americans are tied together through widespread celebration.

Horen is similarly convinced that the holiday season, a season in which he is able to be an individual and celebrate Judaism, “brings everyone together.”

To him, this feeling of unity may ironically spring from the differences between groups of people. He believes that “everyone does their own thing in the holiday season, and who am I to try and change things up?” After all, these differences in viewpoint are crucial for the formation of identity and individuality.  

It’s important to remember that different religions still value many of the same principles, and time with family is an example of this. Because school is held during Eid, a Muslim holiday which can fall between November or December, Fatima is unable to visit Muslim family members living in London or Pakistan, which she wishes she could do.

During the same holiday, Elgendy does a special prayer with her family in the morning, and always celebrates with them by eating out. Like Elgendy, Horen uses a holiday he celebrates — Hanukkah — to connect with his family, lighting the menorah and saying prayers with his close relatives.

Concepts like closeness with family may allow for an expansion in recognition of winter holidays other than Christmas. Elgendy has a hope for the future of the United States of America: an expansion in knowledge of differences. She comments, “[Americans should] stay educated on the multiple other religious holidays during the holiday season, and recognize them.”

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial Celebrates Character Day

Photos: Laila Abu-Ghaida, Harshitha Sayini, Minah Mubasher

On December 20, Centennial students dressed up like their favorite holiday characters.  Inspiration came from holiday classics to new favorites.


For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.

Centennial’s Pencils of Promise Club

Words: Harshitha Sayini

The October 23 bake sale for Pencils of Promise was a success! Pencils of Promise, a club created by both Aneisa Babkir and Minah An, is a small version of the non-profit organization that helps build schools and increase educational developments in third world countries.

The goal for this bake sale was to raise at least $50 through the sale of brownies and cookies. The money collected will be sent to the organization as donation money.

Students seemed eager to grab a few baked goods during their after-school activities in the hallway across the gym. Members of the club are actively participating to raise money throughout the rest of the school year.

Club member Moroti Adewole said, “I thought the bake sale went well. Sales were good initially. The deal change of $1 for one item to $1 for two items attracted more people and the items sold out quicker. Considering a lot of people brought money, the profit was a lot!” The club hopes to gain more members and hold more fundraisers in this coming year.

For more breaking news and photos, follow The Wingspan on Instagram and Twitter @CHSWingspan.